The OKR Starter Kit: Goal-setting for your team
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How to Write OKRs: Templates & Examples

Best practices to get you started quickly.
Acknowledging the fact that objectives and key results should be specific and measurable is simple. Actually writing them to be both is often a challenge. Even with OKR templates to kickstart your goal-setting, writing tips and examples are incredibly helpful when it comes time to start drafting. Here are a few best practices, function-specific OKR examples, and how your OKRs look inside a Coda doc.

5 tips for writing good OKRs
Setting OKRs is a lot like writing a to-do list. While you can certainly jot down a set of unorganized, stream-of-consciousness bullet points, the list probably won’t make sense to anyone else (or even you after a few days). A good to-do list—and good OKRs—strike a balance between flexibility and prescriptiveness. They should give you a solid idea of the goal and how to accomplish that goal, without detailing every single step to get there.

With that in mind, we’ve identified 5 tips for writing good OKRs:

1. Select a few high-performing initiatives—reprioritize everything else.
Most companies and teams go through the OKR process quarterly. Because the cycle is relatively short, it’s best to focus deeply on a few priorities instead and not let the team get distracted by every new shiny feature idea. OKR pioneer John Doerr suggests asking the following question to frame your discussions and measure what matters:

What is most important for the next three (or six, or twelve) months? What are our main priorities for the coming period? Where should people concentrate their efforts?

2. Don’t rush to publish your first drafts.
With only three months to plan and execute, the planning process can be choatic—everyone just wants momentum
now.
But the OKR methodology isn’t a thing to rush, as noted by this Codan in an OKR-focused survey:

You can’t think you’ll get everything drafted, aligned, set, and resolved in one meeting, especially if you want to include the full set of POVs from your team. Some people need/want time to digest and to provide feedback offline or outside the chaos of a rushed meeting; others wish to whiteboard and shout their opinions. And then everything in between.

And when it comes to goal-setting, don’t get attached to your first draft. Write a set of OKRs, let them rest, and come back to them with fresh eyes. Get feedback from everyone on your team. Make adjustments. Confirm your dependencies. And then commit to your goals.

3. Be realistic—and respect the energy and time of your team.
Somewhere between your first and final OKR drafts, you should emphasize realistic timelines and expectations. Good OKRs consider the work that happens
between
company and team goal-related projects. And they encourage proper work-life balance.

4. Metricize your key results.
Although the primary goal of quarterly planning metrics is to measure the success of goals set, metrics also give context to objectives, connect key results back to broader company goals, and help us forecast project impact. To get there, you need to set metrics
for each and every key result
. Here’s a
doc that will destress the process.

5. Adapt OKRs for your culture and context.
Sample OKRs, like the ones below, are a great starting point. But resist the temptation to copy OKRs directly—whether they’re examples or from another team in your company. Your marketing OKRs probably won't be the same as your human resources or sales OKRs. Instead, OKRs should be personal (and specific, if we may say it again). What works for another team may not be appropriate for your team.

OKR examples for different teams
As a reminder, OKR is an acronym for objectives and key results. An objective is a goal, and the objective’s key results are the tasks or milestones that work to achieve your goal. Taking the 5 tips for writing good OKRs into account, objectives should be your company or team’s top priorities. Key results should be measurable, realistic, and a reflection of your team or company.

Company OKR examples
Objective:
Launch new product.
Key results:
Achieve target of 80% customers using app within 1 month of launch.
Hit 60% retention rate for subscribers.
Achieve ARPDAU > $.15.

Objective:
Grow our customer base.
Key results:
Increase new customers by 25%.
Increase NPS score to >98%.
Reduce churn to <5%.

Objective:
Establish a sustainable growth motion.
Key results:
Reduce churn to less than 2% monthly.
Hire 5 new sales team members.
Hit target of $35 million new ARR.

Product OKR examples
Objective:
Deliver new iOS app.
Key results:
Finish MVP by August 1st.
Complete beta test by September 1st.
Publish in app store by October 1st.

Objective:
Run better team meetings.
Key results:
Send pre-reads the day before
every
meeting.
100% of meetings end on time.
Team sentiment increases to 100%.

Objective:
Turn customers into advocates.
Key results:
Increase referral code usage by 25%.
Increase social media engagement by 50%.
Increase positive app reviews by 50%.

Marketing OKR examples
Objective:
Build relationships with existing social media influencers.
Key results:
Draft briefs for 5 potential promotional campaigns.
Reach out to at least 5 influencers each week.
Repackage micro-content for at least 10 blog posts.

Objective:
Increase content on the first page of Google SERP.
Key results:
Conduct SEO audit by August 1st.
Audit existing blog posts with SEO tool and optimize.
Build alt text and title system for images.

Objective:
Increase blog impressions by 50%.
Key results:
Add subscribe CTA to >50% of blog posts by August 1st.
2x blog coverage on social media.

Sales OKR examples
Objective:
Break revenue records.
Key results:
Increase quarterly profit by 15%.
Increase quarterly revenue by 20%.
Increase app subscriptions by 65%.

Objective:
Decrease sales lifecycle.
Key results:
Reduce sales cycle from 90 to 75 days.
Conduct 150 new sales calls.

Objective:
Create an effective sales team.
Key results:
Hire 3 new sales leads.
Hire 2 new sales executives.
Increase qualified sales leads by 30%.

Customer success OKR examples
Objective:
Improve customer support.
Key results:
Launch a new live chat program by August 1st.
Increase NPS score to >98%.
Reduce response time to <4 hours.

Objective:
Create an effective customer success team.
Key results:
Hire 3 customer support leads.
Hire 2 community managers.
Implement customer success team onboarding program focused on customer experience.

Engineering OKR examples
Objective:
Build an effective engineering team.
Key results:
Establish new referral program by August 1st.
Hire 5 senior full stack engineers by end of quarter.
2x the onsite-to-hire ratio.

Objective:
Deliver new iOS app.
Key results:
Contribute 7 story points.
Design beta program by end of August.
Migrate data by end of September.

Objective:
Increase development speed.
Key results:
Reduce the number of bugs per feature by 10%.
Reduce coda review time by 25%.
Increase sprint velocity points by 5%.


How to Write OKRs with Coda
Coda is a doc that brings words, data, and teams together. And considering words, data, and teams are the primary focuses of OKRs, using Coda for your strategic planning just makes sense. With Coda’s building blocks (like tables and integrations with the other tools you already use) and drag-and-drop templates, you have the flexibility to adapt the OKR framework to your company, team, and culture. You might try starting with these:
SMART Goals template
💡 Copy this template or type
/SMART goals
in your doc.

Draft your team’s goals, and then check your work with the SMART questions.

SMART framework overview
The
SMART
framework allows you to set
realistic
and
measurable
goals your team can achieve in 2021 and beyond.
SMART
is an acronym with each letter giving you a mindset for setting goals:
S (Specific)
- Keep your goals very
specific
and
narrow
so that it’s clear what you’re trying to achieve
M (Measurable)
- Establish metrics to ensure you are on track to hit your goals (see templates like this one for KPIs or key performance indicators)
A (Attainable)
- Your team should be able to achieve this goal within a reasonable timeframe (one month, one quarter)
R (Relevant)
- Your team goals should align with your organization’s strategic and business objectives
T (Time-based)
- There should be a specific
end date
for your goals so that your team can create a
workback plan
and
prioritize
tasks leading up to the end date

👎 Example of a non-SMART goal
We will keep our company’s website up to date.

👍 Example of a SMART goal
During our Monday morning 9AM team meeting, get updates from the team on what assets they want to update on the website and publish the changes by Tuesday 9AM. After every update, send changes to the broader company so they are up to date on what’s new on the website.
Team goals 2
0
Goals
How are they specific?
How are they measurable?
How are they attainable?
How are they relevant?
How are they time-based?
1
During our Monday morning 9AM team meeting, get updates from the team on what assets they want to update on the website and publish the changes by Tuesday 9AM. After every update, send changes to the broader company so they are up to date on what’s new on the website.
The goal explicitly names what is required: updates from the team and for those updates to be sent out
Measurement is binary - we either did or did not do it
Easily integrates with the existing team schedule
Works to give visibility to the company at large
Mentions specific days and times - Monday and Tuesday at 9am
There are no rows in this table


Company OKR template
💡 Copy this template or type
/simple OKR tracker
in your doc.

Follow the instructions for creating a set of OKRs for the upcoming quarter. Then use the ‘Key Results’ tracker to update the status of each KR. The OKR dashboard automatically updates to provide you with a view of the team’s overall progress.

Select planning quarter:
Q1
Decide which quarter you’re planning. Then click the button to add new team
to the Objectives table below. After taking a quick peek at the KRs in Step 2, clear all the sample data on this page.
Clear sample data

Add new Q1 objective
Objective
1
Drive increased customer satisfaction
2
Release one new app this year
3
Establish qualified pipeline of leads
There are no rows in this table


Select an objective:
Drive increased customer satisfaction
Select an Objective from the list above. For each Objective, add 1-2 related
Key Results. Identify
one
individual who’ll be responsible for ensuring the Key Result is tracked and achieved.


Add new Key Result
Objective
Key Result
Responsible
Drive increased customer satisfaction
99% Satisfaction Rate on Pulse Surveys
MM
Maria Marquis
Release with 0 bugs
LT
Lola Tseudonym
Release one new app this year
Deliver Q3 specs on time
BD
Buck Dubois
Build V2 software on budget
BD
Buck Dubois
Build V2 Device with 10% decrease in cost
BD
Buck Dubois
Build SW & HW integration with a partner
BD
Buck Dubois
Establish qualified pipeline of leads
Increase leads by 10x
PR
Polly Rose


OKR dashboard
85%
Drive increased customer satisfaction
25%
Release one new app this year
60%
Establish qualified pipeline of leads

Key Results tracker
Select quarter(s) to view
:
All
Objective
Key Result
Responsible
Status
Drive increased customer satisfaction
99% Satisfaction Rate on Pulse Surveys
MM
Maria Marquis
000
80
Release with 0 bugs
LT
Lola Tseudonym
000
90
Release one new app this year
Deliver Q3 specs on time
BD
Buck Dubois
000
20
Build V2 software on budget
BD
Buck Dubois
000
10
Build V2 Device with 10% decrease in cost
BD
Buck Dubois
000
20
Build SW & HW integration with a partner
BD
Buck Dubois
000
50
Establish qualified pipeline of leads
Increase leads by 10x
PR
Polly Rose
000
60





Team OKR template
💡 Copy this template or type
/team goals
in your doc.

Using the
, add your team goals to the Objectives table. Then connect success measurements to each goal in the Key Results table. Key result progress updates will also reflect as progress toward your objectives.
Clear template

Add Objective
Team objectives
0
Goal
Associated Key Results
Progress Towards Key Results
1
Improve customer satisfaction.
Exceed NPS score of 7.
73%
2
Increase recurring revenue.
Reach MRR of $1M.
Reduce churn % to less than .5% monthly.
39%
There are no rows in this table
2
Count
Add Key Result
Team key results
0
Associated Objective
Key Result
Owner
Progress
1
Improve customer satisfaction.
Exceed NPS score of 7.
LT
Lola Tseudonym
000
73
2
Increase recurring revenue.
Reach MRR of $1M.
JB
James Booth
000
65
3
Increase recurring revenue.
Reduce churn % to less than .5% monthly.
AC
Alan Chowansky
000
13
There are no rows in this table
3
Count
T

You can find these OKR templates and more in the Explore panel—and OKR best practices here.

OKR example video walkthrough
Our Business in a Box: OKRs in Coda series shows you how to create a Coda doc that tracks objectives and key results and keeps your team accountable. In this video, you’ll learn how to connect all of your strategic planning tracking tables, so that you only have to make an update once (instead of 10 times throughout your doc). By the end, you’ll have a core OKR template for you and your team to use. Watch part 2 for a lesson in optimizing your OKR doc for employee engagement.



OKR examples FAQs
How do you write a good OKR?
Writing a good OKR takes thought, time to reflect, and feedback from others. Start with these 5 tips:

Select a few high-performing initiatives—reprioritize everything else.
Don’t rush to publish your first drafts.
Be realistic—and respect the energy and time of your team.
Metricize your key results.
Adapt OKRs for your culture and context.

How to set OKRs for your team?
To use OKRs for your team, you first need to identify a goal, or an objective. You should then brainstorm—ideally with your team—the overarching milestones needed to achieve the goal. Once in agreement, you can turn those milestones into time-bound, measurable key results. Here’s our list of templates and best practices for implementing OKR.

What is an effective company OKR example?
Company OKRs are goals for the entire company—they are reflected in team OKRs and set the tone for the entire quarter. Here’s an example of an effective company OKR:

Objective:
Establish a sustainable growth motion.
Key results:
Reduce churn to less than 2% monthly.
Hire 5 new sales team members.
Hit target of $35 million new ARR.

A few of the 25,000+ teams that 🏃‍♀️ on Coda.
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Coda is an all-in-one doc for your team’s unique processes — the rituals that help you succeed. Teams that use Coda get rid of hundreds of documents, spreadsheets, and even bespoke apps, to work quickly and clearly in one place. This template is a Coda doc. Click around to explore.

Find out how to Coda-fy your rituals.
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