Results

Ad-hoc meetings

How much unplanned, ad-hoc meeting time was added to our schedule?
Person
Ad-hoc as % of total
Ad-hoc meeting time
Total time in meetings
1
AC
Al Chen
58%
3 hrs 30 mins
6 hrs
2
LT
Lola Tseudonym
50%
1 hr 30 mins
3 hrs
3
JB
James Booth
32%
2 hrs
6 hrs 15 mins
4
EK
Elise Keith
4%
30 mins
12 hrs 20 mins
5
JD
Joel Davis
0%
-
1 hr
6
MJ
Mary Jones
0%
-
6 hrs 30 mins
There are no rows in this table

What to Look For
Ad-hoc meetings reduce your team’s ability to plan their time. These meetings are especially hard on knowledge workers with delivery responsibilities.

Organizations with high levels of meeting performance maturity work to minimize ad-hoc meetings. This gives teams control over their schedules and establishes a predictable communication rhythm.

Teams plan for meetings in two ways.
Cadence: Teams decide to run the same type of meeting at the same time during each work cycle. For example, a retrospective held at the end of each work sprint is part of that team’s meeting cadence.
Trigger: These meetings are held in response to an event. You can list these using an
If > Then
statement. For example,
IF
a prospect calls about our services,
THEN
sales schedules an introductory meeting.
Ad-hoc meetings, on the other hand,
and often represent a breakdown in your meeting system. If your team gets pulled into lots of ad-hoc meetings, dig into why that’s happening and discuss ways to better handle those situations.
Breakdown of ad-hoc meetings by person
6


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