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Adventure Awards


Ascent Rank

This Patch and Medallion pair is awarded to the Adventurer when he completes the requirements for the Ascent Rank. It is suspended from the right chest pocket flap of his Troop Uniform, and the medallion is affixed to his Troop Standard.

Prerequisite Work

1. Must be a registered Adventurer who has earned the Journey Rank

Trail Badge Work

Earn a total of 20 Trail Badges including:
2. All 9 Core Skills Trail Badges: Aquatics, Camping, Fire Ranger, First Aid, Our Flag, Outdoor Cooking, Ropework, Trail Skills, and Woods Tools. 3. Any 3 True Freedom Trail Badges: Citizenship, Emergency Preparedness, Family Man, Outdoor Life, Personal Resources, and one Fitness Badge (Cycling, Fitness, Hiking, or Swimming). 4. Any 8 other Trail Badges of your choice: remaining True Freedom Trail Badges, published Elective Trail Badges, or Design Your Own Badges.

Servant Service

5. Complete 20 hours of service for each program year as an Adventurer.

Freedom Experience (complete one of the following):

6a. Complete at least 1 Freedom Experience since becoming an Adventurer. 6b. Waive Freedom Experience Requirement (option available until July 1, 2024).

Troop Involvement

7. Maintain a level of in-uniform Troop meeting attendance acceptable to your Advisor (typically 60% or better). 8. Since becoming an Adventurer, participate in at least 6 Troop activities, not including regular meetings, for each year as an Adventurer. (Alternatively, if earning this before July 1, 2024, check this item to waive troop activity requirement).

Leadership

9. Since earning the Journey Rank, complete one of the following leadership options: 9a. As an Adventurer, serve as a First Officer, Second Officer, Quartermaster, Patrol Leader, or other Troop-approved leadership role for a minimum of six months. 9b. At five Troop meetings or outings, demonstrate your leadership ability by planning and instructing a Woodlands Trail patrol in significant skills approved by your Advisor and the Woodlands Trail Ranger. 9c. At five Troop meetings or outings, demonstrate your leadership ability by planning and instructing a Navigators or Adventurers patrol in significant Trail Badge skills approved by your Advisor, Trail Guide, and, if applicable, the Navigators Trailmaster. 9d. Plan and implement a Troop or patrol camping or high adventure trip including the program, food, and wilderness travel plans (biking, hiking, paddle craft, etc.) approved by your Advisor. 9e. Plan and implement an Adventurers-only high adventure or extended travel experience including the program, food, and travel plans approved by your Advisor. 9f. Plan and implement a Troop-wide or patrol service project approved by your Advisor. 9g. Waive leadership requirement (option available until July 1, 2024).

Journey Rank

The Journey Rank is the fourth overall Rank and the first True Freedom Rank open to Adventurer Trailmen.

Prerequisite Work

1. Must be a registered Adventurer who has earned the Ready Trailman Rank.

Traditions

Prior to completing any other requirement, read the following and discuss your understanding with your Advisor or Trail Guide: 2. The Freedom Experience Catalog 3. The Adventurers Worthy Life Award requirements 4. The Patrol Leaders Guidebook 5. The Discipleship Square 6. The SCoRe method of discipline 7. The True Freedom Trail Badges

Trail Badge Work

Earn a cummulative total of 15 Trail Badges including: 8. All 9 Core Skills Trail Badges: Aquatics, Camping, Fire Ranger, First Aid, Our Flag, Outdoor Cooking, Ropework, Trail Skills, and Woods Tools. 9. Any one True Freedom Trail Badge: Citizenship, Emergency Preparedness, Family Man, Outdoor Life, Personal Resources, and one Fitness Badge (Cycling, Fitness, Hiking, or Swimming). 10. Any 5 other Trail Badges of your choice: remaining True Freedom Trail Badges, published Elective Trail Badges, or Design Your Own Badges.

Servant Service

11. Complete 20 hours of service for each program year as an Adventurer.

Freedom Experience

12. Draft a plan for completing at least four Freedom Experiences as an Adventurer, including two minors and a major.

Troop Involvement

13. Maintain a level of in-uniform Troop meeting attendance acceptable to your Advisor (typically 60% or better). 14. Since becoming an Adventurer, participate in at least 6 Troop activities, not including regular meetings, for each year as an Adventurer. (Alternatively, if earning this before July 1, 2024, check this item to waive troop activity requirement).

Leadership

15. Since earning the Ready Trailman Rank, complete one of the following leadership options: 15a. As an Adventurer, serve as a First Officer, Second Officer, Quartermaster, Patrol Leader, or other Troop-approved leadership role for a minimum of six months. 15b. At five Troop meetings or outings, demonstrate your leadership ability by planning and instructing a Woodlands Trail patrol in significant skills approved by your Advisor and the Woodlands Trail Ranger. 15c. At five Troop meetings or outings, demonstrate your leadership ability by planning and instructing a Navigators or Adventurers patrol in significant Trail Badge skills approved by your Advisor, Trail Guide, and, if applicable, the Navigators Trailmaster. 15d. Plan and implement a Troop or patrol camping or high adventure trip including the program, food, and wilderness travel plans (biking, hiking, paddle craft, etc.) approved by your Advisor. 15e. Plan and implement an Adventurers-only high adventure or extended travel experience including the program, food, and travel plans approved by your Advisor. 15f. Plan and implement a Troop-wide or patrol service project approved by your Advisor. 15g. Waive leadership requirement (option available until July 1, 2024).

Review

16. Successfully complete an Advancement Conference in uniform. 17. Successfully complete a Board of Review in uniform.

Citizenship

Because it is written with a mature preparation for manhood, True Freedom Trail Badges are to be earned only by registered Adventurer Trailmen.

This Trail Badge, awarded to an Adventurer Trailman on completion of the requirements, is affixed to the Trailman's Troop Standard.

Do all requirements (1-9).

1. Research what the Bible says about God creating man and woman in his own image and likeness. Describe how this truth should affect the following: a. The sacredness of life itself and our view of human dignity. b. How we should treat people in our society. c. How the government makes laws. d. Who you will or will not vote for in elections when you are an adult. 2. Do one of the following activities (Do one: 2a or 2b). 2a. Participate in a discussion about the issues in requirement 1 above with your patrol, Troop, family, or another group. 2b. Write a paper or prepare a presentation about what you learned from your research and thinking about the issues addressed in requirement 1. 3. Political and economic systems: a. Define the following political systems: democracy, republic, autocracy, and oligarchy. b. Define the following economic systems: capitalism, socialism, and communism. c. Name a country that practices each type of political system and a country that practices each type of economic system. d. Select one of the above countries with a non-constitutional form of government and contrast the treatment of its citizens and noncitizens with the treatment of citizens and noncitizens in the United States (US). 4. Read the US Constitution and all its amendments and then do the following: a. Describe the three different branches of our federal government and explain their respective functions. b. Find one federal program or service that is a constitutional function of the federal government and explain why it should be provided at the federal level. c. Find one federal program or service that is not a constitutional function of the federal government and explain why it should be provided at the state or local level. d. Explain how the Electoral College is used to elect the president and how that differs from the popular vote. e. Explain the following constitutional principles: popular sovereignty, limited government, separation of powers, checks and balances, judicial review, and federalism. f. Discuss the Bill of Rights, the rights we are guaranteed as citizens of the United States, and the circumstances under which a citizen can lose some of those rights. 5. Explain the responsibilities of US citizenship. 6. Investigate US citizenship and naturalization requirements using US Citizenship and Immigration Service publications or their web site and do the following: a. List the criteria for automatic US citizenship. b. List the qualifications to become a naturalized US citizen. 7. Do the following requirements on international treaties: a. Explain how international treaties are negotiated, signed, and ratified. b. Describe the authority of ratified treaties in US law (US Constitution, Article VI). c. Investigate the issues involved in one controversial treaty that the US has signed, but has not ratified. d. Present an argument either in favor or against ratification of your selected treaty. 8. Do the following requirements on local, county, and state governments: a. Determine the types of local and county government used where you live. b. List any major differences of your state government structure relative to the federal government structure. c. List at least five services or programs provided for citizens by each of your local, county, and state governments (at least five for each level of government). d. List the major taxes and fees collected by your local, county, and state governments to pay for the services they provide. e. Explain jury duty, the county juror selection process, and the citizen’s duty to serve. f. List the residency, age, and registration requirements to vote where you live. 9. Do three of the following citizenship activities (Do three: 9a, 9b, 9c, 9d, 9e, 9f, 9g, 9h, 9i, 9j, or 9k): 9a. Examine the list of 100 Civics Questions from the US Citizenship and Immigration Services. Prepare for and pass the exam as given by USCIS (Answer 6 out of 10 questions picked at random from the 100 questions). 9b. List the federal taxes that citizens may be required to pay and explain how each is assessed and collected. Compare federal government income with expenses for the last year reported. 9c. Describe how a bill is written, passed in Congress or your state legislature, and signed into law. 9d. List your elected representatives in local, county, state and Federal governments. Select one representative and one issue you care about. Examine his voting record on that issue. Communicate with your representative by email, letter, fax, phone, or in person to express your support or disagreement with his position. 9e. List three important local, state, or national political issues for which Biblical moral principles directly apply. Name a bill currently in the local government, state legislature, or US Congress that addresses at least one of these issues. List at least three arguments supporting the bill and at least three arguments opposing the bill. 9f. Explain the differences between and the relationship of government debt and budget deficit. For your local, county, state, and federal governments, determine the amount of debt and budget deficit at the end of their last reported fiscal year. 9g. Attend a meeting of your local government, county government, school board, or park board. Discuss some of the agenda items that are discussed, voted on, or opened to the public for community comments. 9h. Participate in a debate of an issue of importance on a local, state, or national level. 9i. Visit your state capitol and sit in on a legislative session. 9j. Visit Washington D.C. and sit in on a legislative session. 9k. Visit national landmarks in Washington D.C. such as the Capitol, Library of Congress, National Archives, Washington Monument or Jefferson Memorial, Lincoln Memorial, World War II Memorial, Korean War Memorial, or Vietnam War Memorial.

Emergency Preparedness

Because it is written with a mature preparation for manhood, True Freedom Trail Badges are to be earned only by registered Adventurer Trailmen.

This Trail Badge, awarded to an Adventurer Trailman on completion of the requirements, is affixed to the Trailman's Troop Standard.

Do all requirements (1-12).

1. Read Genesis Chapter 3. a. Explain how sin first entered the world. b. Why is this event referred to as the “Fall of Man?” 2. Read Psalm 24:1 and Genesis 1:28-31. a. Is the earth still good and owned by God even in its fallen state? b. Explain how the world’s fallen and imperfect nature due to the entrance of sin into the world is connected to natural disasters (hurricanes, earthquakes, floods, wild fires) and major emergencies like war and terrorism. 3. Read Isaiah 55:9 and explain how we can we still trust in God even though bad things happen in our lives and in the world. 4. Do one of the following activities. (Do one: 4a or 4b) 4a. Participate in a discussion about the issues in items 1-3 above with your patrol, Troop, family, or another group. 4b. Write a paper or prepare a presentation about what you learned from your research and thinking about the above issues. 5. Make a chart assessing your risk as high, medium, or low for the following emergencies and understand each one and the unique challenges each presents: a. Natural i. Flood ii. Tornado iii. Hurricane iv. Winter Storm v. Extreme Heat vi. Earthquake vii. Volcano viii. Landslide ix. Tsunami x. Wildfire xi. Pandemic b. Technological i. Blackout ii. Hazardous Materials iii. Nuclear Power Plants iv. Household Chemical c. Terrorist i. Explosions ii. Biological Attack iii. Chemical Attack iv. Cyber Attack v. Nuclear Device vi. EMP d. Person/Property i. Home Fire ii. Vehicle Accident iii. Boating Accident iv. Gas Leak v. Burglary vi. Carbon Monoxide Poisoning vii. Drowning viii. Wilderness/Backcountry Accident 6. Create an emergency plan for your family for the 10 highest risks that you discovered in your research for number 5 above. Include the following information: a. Prevention and preparation necessary b. Reaction during an emergency including alternate communication plans, meeting locations, and alternate methods for daily tasks of the home c. Special needs to be considered for the elderly, infirm, infants, and small children and animals d. What to do when the immediate danger is passed or in a prolonged evacuation 7. Create a list of necessary items and quantities for a Basic Disaster Supply Kit for three days and for two weeks. List additional items you may want for more serious long-term disasters. Check off the things you currently have on hand and circle those you don't have or need more of. 8. Create a list of emergency items to keep in your car and at work. 9. List local warning systems available in your area. 10. Describe the emergency plans in place at your school, your church, your meeting location, and your workplace (if applicable). 11. Explain the following emergency water treatment methods: chlorination, distillation, boiling, and filtering. 12. Present the information you learned in this badge to your family.

Family Man

Because it is written with a mature preparation for manhood, True Freedom Trail Badges are to be earned only by registered Adventurer Trailmen. The Family Man Trail Badge is a 2-part Trail Badge consisting of general requirements and family activities requirements. BOTH PARTS (Part A and Part B) must be completed as instructed in order to earn this Trail Badge.

This Trail Badge, awarded to an Adventurer Trailman on completion of the requirements, is affixed to the Trailman's Troop Standard.

PART A: Do All Foundation Requirements (1-5)

1. Family a. A family is defined legally and seen in the Bible as a group of people related in one of three ways. What are the three ways? b. Explain the difference between Immediate Family and Extended Family. 2. Marriage a. Read Genesis 2:18-24 and explain how the Bible defines marriage. b. Explain how the unique relationship, marriage, reflects the triune nature of God. c. Read Ephesians 5:22-33 and explain how the nature of marriage is created by God as a picture of His love for His people. d. In Ephesians 5:25, how is the relationship between Christ and the Church similar to the relationship between a husband and his wife? e. Having read Genesis 2:18-24, read Revelation 21:9 and explain how the Bible both begins and ends with a marriage. 3. Husbands & Fathers a. List some of the ways that God has designed men and women differently. b. Explain how fathers and mothers bring different strengths that help raise children in a family. c. Read 2 Thessalonians 3:6-12 and 1 Timothy 5:8. Explain the importance of hard work and the duty of being a provider as it applies to a man who is a husband or father. 4. Family, Society & Church a. Why are families important to a strong society? b. What are some of the problems that come from families breaking down? c. Explain how Christians and churches can help become a “father to the fatherless” for families that experience death, divorce, or abandonment involving a father. 5. Servant Leadership (Reference John 13:1-5, 12-17; Titus 1:6-9) a. Explain the concept of servant leadership. b. Explain how servant leadership involves both demonstrating humility and strength. c. Discuss examples of servant leadership in the Troop. d. Discuss examples of servant leadership in your family. e. Brainstorm implementations of servant leadership as future fathers.

PART B: Do all requirements (6-9).

6. Nutrition Using the Federal Food Guidelines (Do one: 6a, 6b, or 6c) 6a. Learn about the food guidelines. i. Determine the daily caloric needs for someone of your age and weight. ii. How much water should you be drinking each day and why? iii. Write down everything you eat and drink for one week. iv. Plan a menu of healthy meals for three days. 6b. Learn the relationship between your diet and good health. i. Explain the food guidelines and causes of obesity in childhood and among teenagers. ii. List ways to avoid obesity, including diet and exercise. iii. Plan one week of healthy menus for your family. iv. Select one of your healthy meals and prepare it for your family. Clean up afterwards. 6c. Learn about the food guidelines and plan balanced meals for your family for one day including breakfast, lunch, and dinner. i. Prepare a list of needed ingredients. ii. Show your menus and ingredients list to your Leader. iii. Prepare the planned breakfast, lunch, and dinner on one day. iv. Clean up after each meal. 7. Household Tasks (Do one: 7a or 7b) 7a. Do all of the following: i. Learn the proper way to do at least five household tasks and perform them for at least one month. These are in addition to grocery shopping, laundry, and ironing task required for ii-iv below. ii. Help your family with the grocery shopping for one week, including bagging the groceries, carrying them in, and putting them away properly. iii. Learn how to do laundry and then do the laundry for yourself or your family for a week. iv. Learn how to use an iron and the appropriate temperatures for different fabrics. Press at least three items including something with sleeves. 7b. With your parents, agree on at least five recurrent household tasks. Track your household tasks for three months on a tracking log. 8. Do one of the following family projects options (Do one: 8a, 8b or 8c). 8a. Help your family with a family project. This could be a maintenance activity such as cleaning out the garage, spring landscaping, or spring-cleaning. Or it might be a new project such as painting a room or redecorating. List the role of each family member in the project completion. 8b. Work with your family to clean out the basement or garage. Sort items into three categories: things to keep, things to donate, and things for the trash. Reorganize as needed as you return items to the space. Take your donated items to a charity and the rest to the trashcan. 8c. Perform a community service project with your family. Some examples are to: Participate in a church service day project; help clean up your church or school; plant trees or flowers in a public area and care for them; plan, cook, and deliver a meal to someone in need; do yard work for someone in need; visit the elderly or disabled; set-up a recycling drive and donate the proceeds to charity. 9. Do one of the family communication options (Do one: 9a, 9b, 9c, or 9d). 9a. Plan a celebration, holiday party or special outing for your family and help to implement it. Include in the plan any costs involved for supplies, invitations, food, preparations, cleaning, transportation, lodging, or needed equipment. Discuss with your family any changes you would make if you were to do it again. 9b. Plan and participate in a family meeting. Set ground rules, such as to respect all opinions and to have everyone attend and be allowed to share input. Discuss issues important to your family. For example, decide how chores will be completed, discuss vacation ideas and options, plan a family night or find solutions to a problem. 9c. Help a sibling or younger child with homework for a week. 9d. Read to a sibling or younger child each day for a week.

Outdoor Life

** Because it is written with a mature preparation for manhood, True Freedom Trail Badges are to be earned only by registered Adventurer Trailmen. Outdoor Life is a 3-part Trail Badge consisting of general requirements, Trailman-selected Outdoor Life trail requirements, and outdoor activities requirements. ALL THREE PARTS must be completed as instructed in order to earn this Trail Badge. This Trail Badge, awarded to an Adventurer Trailman on completion of the requirements, is affixed to the Trailman's Troop Standard.

Part A - Do all of the following requirements (1-3)

1. Consider what we can learn about God and his creation from working, playing, and doing activities outdoors as opposed to doing the same activities indoors (Do one: 1a or 1b). Do one of the following: 1a. Participate in a discussion about this topic with your patrol, Troop, family, or another group. 1b. Write a paper or prepare a presentation about what you learned from your research and thinking about the above issue. 2. For your selected Trail, explain or write out your plans for the following: a. Inclement and severe weather b. Sleeping and shelter c. Transporting equipment (individual and group) d. Sanitation: Safe drinking water, washing (self, dishes, etc.), and human waste disposal e. Food supply, preparation, and protection from wild animals, bad weather, and spoilage 3. Construct a shelter or lean-to using only a tarp, rope, and any natural items at the location such as rocks, logs, or sticks or equipment associated with your selected Trail. Construct (if permitted) or describe how to make your own bedding using natural items and a ground cloth.

PART B—Do one requirement (Do one: 4A, 4B, 4C, 4D, or 4E).

4A. Backpacking Trail 1. On a patrol or Troop backpack trip, serve as the trip quartermaster and do the following: a. Plan the menu for the trip and purchase the food. b. Check the weather report and update your individual and group equipment lists. c. Demonstrate correctly packing your backpack for the group. d. Lead a shake-down session to eliminate unnecessary weight, and do the following: i. Check the packs of your group for compliance with the individual equipment list for the trip. ii. Distribute the group equipment and food to each participant in a way that balances group needs with individual weight-carrying capacity. iii. Verify that each backpacker has an acceptable pack weight (no more than ¼ body weight). 2. On a patrol or Troop backpack trip, serve as the trip planner and do the following: a. Present a trail safety orientation to the group and explain why going downhill is where most injuries occur and why we do not short-cut switchbacks. b. Using a map of the area where you will be hiking, plan your route and camp site(s) using one of the backpacking metrics to balance the difficulties of each of the days. See the Backpacking Metrics section in the Backpacking Elective Trail Badge for the metric definitions. c. Give a copy of your route, camp site(s), departure time, and return time to your leaders and parents who are not hiking with you. d. Check the weather report and update your trip plan as needed. e. Review the navigation skills from the Trail Skills Trail Badge. Lead the hiking and perform all trail navigation, including demonstrating orienting a map, correcting for magnetic declination, and finding your location on the map using bearings to landmarks. 3. Participate in backpack trips as an Adventurer that include the following: a. At least 10 nights backcountry camping as an Adventurer on backpack trips in addition to the 15 nights camping required for Camping Trail Badge. Includes nights in tent, improvised shelter, permanent trail shelter open on one side, or under the stars while in the backcountry on a backpack trip. b. At least 7 days of backpacking with a BTM (See The Trailman’s Handbook) of at least 4 hours per day (8 miles per day on level ground) c. A total BTM (See The Trailman’s Handbook) experience total of at least 40 hours (80 miles on level ground) 4B. Camping Trail 1. Plan a campout for your patrol or Troop with an individual equipment list, a group equipment list, duty roster, and activity/program plan. 2. Spend at least 40 nights camping in a tent, in an improvised shelter, in a permanent trail shelter open on one side, or under the stars, and participate in assigned cooking, clean-up and other camping related duties. This includes all nights camping while a Navigator or Adventurer whether with your Troop or another group and includes the nights camping for Camping Trail Badge. 4C. Cycling Trail 1. On a patrol or Troop bicycle trip, serve as the trip quartermaster and do the following: a. Plan the menu for the trip and purchase the food. b. Check the weather report and update your individual and group equipment lists. c. Demonstrate correctly packing your gear for the group. d. Lead a shake-down session to eliminate unnecessary weight and do the following: i. Check the bike packs of your group for compliance with the individual equipment list for the trip. ii. Distribute the group equipment and food to each participant in a way that balances group needs with weight-carrying capacity. 2. On a patrol or Troop bicycle trip, serve as the trip planner and do the following: a. Present a trip safety orientation to the group covering bicycle safety and traffic laws. b. Using a map of the area where you will be bicycling, plan your route and camp site(s). c. Give a copy of your route, camp site(s), departure time, and return time to your leaders and parents who are not travelling with you. d. Check the weather report and update your trip plan as needed. e. Review the navigation skills needed for bicycle touring. Lead the trip and perform all navigation. 3. Participate in bicycle trips as an Adventurer that include the following: a. At least 10 nights camping as an Adventurer on bicycle trips in addition to the 15 nights camping required for Camping Trail Badge. Includes nights in tent, improvised shelter, permanent trail shelter open on one side, or under the stars while on a bicycle trip. b. At least 7 days of bicycling at least 40 miles per day c. A total bicycling mileage of at least 400 miles 4D. Paddle Craft Trail 1. On a patrol or Troop wilderness paddle craft trip, serve as the trip quartermaster and do the following: a. Plan the menu for the trip and purchase the food. b. Check the weather report and update your individual and group equipment lists. c. Demonstrate correctly packing your gear for the group. d. Lead a shake-down session to eliminate unnecessary weight and do the following: i. Check the packs of your group for compliance with the individual equipment list for the trip. ii. Distribute the group equipment and food to each participant in a way that balances group needs with boat and individual portaging weight-carrying capacity (if any portaging is part of the trip). 2. On a patrol or Troop wilderness paddle craft trip, serve as the trip planner and do the following: a. Present a trip safety orientation to the group covering water safety and portaging safety (if any portaging is part of the trip). b. Using a map of the area where you will be paddling, plan your route and camp site(s). c. Give a copy of your route, camp site(s), departure time, and return time to your leaders and parents who are not travelling with you. d. Check the weather report and update your trip plan as needed. e. Review the navigation skills from Trail Skills Trail Badge. Lead the trip and perform all on-water and portaging navigation including demonstrating orienting a map, correcting for magnetic declination, and finding your location on the map using bearings to landmarks. 3. Participate in wilderness paddle craft trips as an Adventurer that include the following: a. At least 10 nights backcountry camping as an Adventurer on paddle craft trips in addition to the 15 nights camping required for Camping Trail Badge. Includes nights in tent, improvised shelter, permanent trail shelter open on one side, or under the stars while in the backcountry on a paddle craft trip. b. At least 7 days of paddling with at least 10 miles per day (flat water) c. A total paddling mileage of at least 100 miles (flat water) 4E. Sailing Trail 1. On a patrol or Troop ocean or great lakes sailing trip, serve as the trip quartermaster and do the following: a. Plan the menu for the trip and purchase the food. b. Check the weather report and update your individual and group equipment lists. c. Demonstrate correctly packing your gear for the group. d. Lead a shake-down session to eliminate unnecessary weight: Check the packs of your group for compliance with the individual equipment list for the trip. 2. On a patrol or Troop ocean or great lakes sailing trip, serve as the trip planner and do the following: a. Present a trip safety orientation to the group covering water safety and boat safety. b. Using a map of the area where you will be sailing, plan your route and camp site(s). c. Give a copy of your route, camp site(s) or mooring locations, departure time, and return time to your leaders and parents who are not travelling with you. d. Check the weather report and update your trip plan as needed. e. Review the navigation skills for sailing. Perform on-water navigation and man the helm. 3. Participate in sailing trips as an Adventurer that include the following: a. At least 10 nights camping or sleeping aboard as an Adventurer on sailing trips in addition to the 15 nights camping required for Camping Trail Badge. Includes nights in tent, improvised shelter, permanent trail shelter open on one side, under the stars or on-board the sailboat while on a sailing trip. b. At least 10 full days of sailing

PART C—Do all requirements (5-8).

5. Do one of the outdoor adventure activities options (Do one: 5a, 5b, 5c, 5d, 5e, 5f, 5g, 5h, 5i, 5j, or 5k). 5a. Ascend a mountain to reach the summit requiring at least 10 equivalent miles and gaining at least 1,000 feet in elevation (for day hiking each 1,000 feet of elevation gain is equivalent to 1.5 additional miles). 5b. Backpack at least overnight covering a total of 10 equivalent miles (for backpacking each 1,000 feet of elevation gain is equivalent to 2 additional miles). 5c. Snow shoe or cross country ski at least 5 miles. 5d. Take a paddle craft day trip of at least 5 hours paddling and requiring the packing of one meal to eat en-route. 5e. Go on a road bike camping trip of at least 20 total miles and 1 night camping. 5f. Go on a mountain bike camping trip of at least 5 total miles and 1 night camping. 5g. Camp overnight in the snow (winter camping). 5h. Participate in a rock climbing day with at least 4 climbs, one rappel, with one climb of at least 5.6 on the Yosemite Decimal System (YDS) rating system. 5i. Go camping at least overnight and sleep under the stars (no tent). 5j. Lead a younger patrol on a backpacking trip. 5k. Participate in a trail conservation or service project with your Troop, patrol, or family. 6. Do one of the outdoor cooking activities options (Do one: 6a, 6b, 6c, 6d, 6e, or 6f). 6a. Demonstrate to a younger boy or patrol two things you can cook in either a box oven, Dutch oven, or can stove. 6b. Create an Outdoor Meal Cookbook for your Troop or add to an existing one, include a minimum of two breakfasts, two dinners, and two desserts. Try out each recipe first. 6c. Cook something in two of the following ways: a paper bag, paper cup, orange peel, or cardboard milk carton. 6d. Using a box oven, prepare and bake a meal and a dessert or bread. 6e. Learn how to use a Dutch oven. Use the Dutch oven to cook a dinner and bake either bread or a dessert. 6f. Plan two days’ worth of meals for a backpacking trip. Keep in mind items that are lightweight and do not require refrigeration or a cooler. Go to the grocery and make a price list for the cost of the items you have planned. Discuss how “re-packaging” your ingredients can help use space more efficiently and divide the weight evenly among participants. 7. Do one of the outdoor information activities options (Do one: 7a, 7b, 7c, or 7d). 7a. Make a presentation to your patrol or Troop about one of the following: i. A scenic or historic trail (for examples, see National Park Service National Trails System) ii. National, State, or other parks with camping areas and adventure activities iii. National or state bike paths or routes iv. Wilderness paddle craft areas (Boundary Waters, Channel Islands, etc.) v. An ocean or Great Lakes area for sailing adventures 7b. Have an experienced adult speak to your Troop or patrol about nearby wilderness destinations and safety. Speakers may be found at local outdoor clubs, local outdoor stores, the Department of Natural Resources, or other outdoor related agencies and companies. 7c. Attend a free seminar at an outdoor equipment store on a topic related to backpacking, camping, cycling, paddle craft, or sailing. 7d. Invite an experienced backpacker, camper, paddler, or sailor to give your Troop or patrol a talk about his travels. 8. Do one of the outdoor gear activities options (Do one: 8a, 8b, 8c, 8d, 8e, or 8f). 8a. Research at least three different materials for sleeping bag filling. Explain the advantages and disadvantages of each, including weight, insulation, and performance when wet. Present your findings to a patrol in your Troop. 8b. Research warm and cool weather clothing for outdoor activities. Include information about layering, insulation, wicking materials, rain gear, head coverings, and footwear. Present your findings to a patrol in your Troop. 8c. Research types and options when buying a tent for camping and for backpacking. Include information about weight, price, space, weather, extras and other considerations. Present your findings to a patrol in your Troop. 8d. Make an item of gear from scratch (e.g. small drawstring bag). 8e. Make an item of gear from a kit (e.g. gaiters). 8f. Explain the advantages and disadvantages of internal and external frame backpacks. Visit a store and try out both. Find one that fits your back. Show the key elements for sizing the pack correctly for an individual, and demonstrate how to use the adjustment features on your backpack.

Personal Resources

** Because it is written with a mature preparation for manhood, True Freedom Trail Badges are to be earned only by registered Adventurer Trailmen. Personal Resources is a 5-part Trail Badge consisting of general requirements, time management activities, money management options, money management activities, and communication activities requirements. ALL FIVE PARTS (Parts A, B, C, D and E) must be completed as instructed in order to earn this Trail Badge. This Trail Badge, awarded to an Adventurer Trailman on completion of the requirements, is affixed to the Trailman's Troop Standard.

PART A—Do all requirements (1-5).

1. Where do all the physical things in the world we use and work with come from? 2. Read Genesis 1:28-31. a. What do these verses say about whether or not we should use the natural resources of the earth? b. What does it mean to “subdue the earth and have dominion over it?” c. In the Trail Life Oath, what does it mean “to be a good steward of creation”? d. How is money used as a tool to place a value upon, acquire, and help exchange wealth and natural resources? 3. Read 1 Timothy 6:9-10. a. What does this verse say about money? b. How can this verse be easily misunderstood? 4. Read Mathew 19:23-26. a. Discuss the need to acquire wealth and the dangers of becoming rich. b. Research if there were godly men of great wealth in the Old and New Testaments of the Bible. c. Discuss how much more effectively you can feed the poor, care for widows and orphans, support missionaries, and be generous with others when you have wealth. 5. Do one of the following activities: 5a or 5b 5a. Participate in a discussion about the issues in requirements 1-4 above with your patrol, Troop, family, or another group. 5b. Write a paper or prepare a presentation about what you learned from your research and thinking about the above issues in requirements 1-4 above.

PART B—Do all time management activities sequentially (6-9).

6. Make a prioritized list of activities and tasks for a week. 7. Make a schedule for that same week showing, at a minimum, school, church, meal times, exercise, activities, and tasks. 8. Follow your schedule and check off items on your list as they are completed. Note which items went as planned and which, if any, were late or took longer than expected. 9. Tell your mentor what you learned from this exercise and discuss whether you are more schedule or task-oriented.

PART C - Do one money management requirement (Do One: 10A or 10B).

10A. Money Management Course Option: a. Complete a biblically based money-management course for teens that covers the topics in this section such as Dave Ramsey’s Foundations in Personal Finance: High School Edition for Self Study or for Homeschool. 10B. Money Management Forums Option: (In a forum, everyone studies beforehand and then discusses the issues. Forum facilitators rotate for each topic. All forum requirements may be completed independently or through school coursework, a Trail Life patrol discussion, or a parentally-approved online group discussion.) 1. Economic Stewardship Forum Topics a. Concept of stewardship b. Difference between the things you want, the things you need and things you should share c. Danger in finding your value or identity in material things instead of Christ d. Explain the importance of charitable giving 2. Insurance Forum Topics e. insurance is meant to protect against what? f. Discuss which of the following types of insurance you need and under what circumstances: i. Life and Health Insurance: life, health, disability, accidental death and dismemberment, and long term care. ii. Personal Property and Casualty Insurance: homeowners, renters, auto, personal umbrella, recreational vehicle, boat owners, jewelry or other fine arts. iii. Business Property and Casualty Insurance: general liability, professional liability, umbrella liability, workers compensation, property, and industry specific policies. 3. Debt Forum Topics g. Consequences when expenses exceed income and the possible causes being in debt h. Explain these types of debt, their advantages and disadvantages: Mortgage, auto loan, home equity loan, credit card i. Why credit card debt is especially dangerous j. Difference between a debit card and a credit card k. Alternatives to going into debt for a purchase l. What steps can be taken to get out of debt? m. How a budget helps you to avoid debt 4. Investment Forum Topics n. Discuss the advantages, disadvantages, and expected rates of return for: i. Stocks ii. Bonds iii. Mutual funds iv. Certificates of deposit v. Money market accounts vi. Bank savings accounts vii. Annuities.

PART D—Do all money management activities (11-13).

11. Budgeting (Do one: 11a, 11b, or 11c) 11a. Pick two jobs or businesses i. Compute the cost to get into each job (school, training, tools, equipment, business start-up costs, etc.). ii. Determine pay or typical net income. iii. Ignoring interest, determine how long it takes to earn back your start-up costs using 25% of income. iv. Compare start-up costs and time to pay them back. 11b. Develop a budget for you as a single 25 year old not living at home. i. Pick a job. ii. Research average pay. iii. Make complete budget including: 1. Housing – rent or mortgage (no more than 25% of gross income) 2. Utilities (electric, gas, phone, Internet, cable, etc.) 3. Food, clothing, and hygiene supplies 4. Auto (loan payment, gasoline, insurance, maintenance, licensing) 5. Other transportation (bus, train, etc.) 6. Health (insurance, doctor/dentist visits, drugs, etc.) 7. Fun (travel, movies, eating out, and other entertainment) 8.Education and training 9. Charitable giving (church, missions, and other charities) 10. Taxes (income, FICA, self-employment, property, miscellaneous state taxes) iv. Compute the percentage of your gross income budgeted for each category and present in tabular or graphical form (e.g. a pie chart). 11c. Develop a three-month budget and track your income and expense. i. Create a three-month budget for all of your income and expenses, including spending, saving, and giving. ii. If you do not have one, set up a checking and a linked savings account to use for this activity. iii. Track your actual income and expenses for three months. iv. Deposit your saving amount in your savings account and some of your giving or spending amount in your checking account. v. During the three months, write several checks, make several deposits, keep a checkbook, and balance your checkbook with the monthly bank statement. vi. After one month, explain to your mentor any deviations from your original plan including unexpected expenses. vii. Adjust your budget based on what you learned from the first month. viii. At the end of three months, explain any deviations from your adjusted plan including unexpected expenses. 12. Investments (Do one: 12a, 12b, 12c, or 12d) 12a. Play an online virtual Stock Exchange game. i. Play for at least three months to see some of the long-term effect of the market. ii. Have your Mentor set up a game for all in your Unit working on this badge or include multiple units to have enough players. iii. Check at least weekly on your investments and make any adjustments you think will help your portfolio grow. iv. Discuss the results at the end, comparing how each person did with his strategy. 12b. Play the Portfolio on Paper investment game for at least three months. i. You have $5,000 in pretend money to invest in the stock market. ii. Investigate companies in which you would like to invest. iii. Create a portfolio on paper or on the computer and track your virtual investment. iv. You may sell and purchase new stocks as often as you wish but you must deduct $10 each time you do so. v. At the end of the game, evaluate the income and change in your investment value. vi. Compare your results with others in your Unit who also complete this exercise. 12c. Select a buy/sell rule and analyze five (5) stocks and a market index fund using one year of historical data to assess how well the rule worked over that year for the 5 stocks and the index fund vs. a buy and hold strategy. 12d. Assume that right now you are retiring at age 67 after having worked and paid into social security for 45 years. Do the following: i. Compute your approximate social security benefit and life expectancy. . From those compute the present value of your expected social security payout. ii. Select two stock indexes or funds that have existed for at least 45 years and collect a value for each year (same date such as year-end). For each stock index or fund, compute the present value of annual investments of your total annual social security part of the FICA payroll tax. Use the sum of the employee and employer’s share (the self-employment rate) of the social security part of FICA payroll tax. Use the current combined tax rate of 12.4% for all years and the income level(s) you assumed for the social security benefit calculation. iii. Compare the present values from i and ii above and discuss the results. 13. Debt (Do one: 13a or 13b) 13a. Student loan payback analysis i. Choose a field of study and associated business or career. Determine the current average annual pay for that career or business. ii. Pick two schools with significantly different annual costs. iii. Total up those costs and determine a reasonable amount per year you can pay for school. iv. Assume the remainder is funded with student loans and total the loan amount for each school. v. Look up the current student loan rate and compute how long it will take to pay each loan back at ten percent of your income. 13b. Compute the monthly payment and total interest paid for the following loans and explain what you learned from this exercise. i. 15-year mortgage of $100,000 at 5% annual interest (180 monthly payments) ii. 30-year mortgage of $100,000 at 5% annual interest (360 monthly payments) iii. 15-year payoff of $20,000 credit card debt at 20% annual interest (180 monthly payments) iv. 30-year payoff of $20,000 credit card debt at 20% annual interest (360 monthly payments)

PART E - Do all communication activities requirements (14-15).

14. Document one money management activity in a short written report including graphics to communicate the results. 15. Present the findings of either the same or a different money management activity in a short presentation to your Mentor and patrol.

Horizon Rank

** Prerequisite: Earn the Journey Award. This Patch and Medallion pair is awarded to the Adventurer when he completes the requirements for Horizon. The patch is suspended from a button on his uniform. The medallion is affixed to his Troop Standard.

Prerequisite Work (complete one of the following):

1a. Must be a registered Adventurer who has earned Ascent Rank 1b. Earn the Journey Award under the 2019 program requirements (option available until July 1, 2024).

Trail Badge Work

Earn a cumulative total of 25 Trail Badges including: 2. All 9 Core Skills Trail Badges: Aquatics, Camping, Fire Ranger, First Aid, Our Flag, Outdoor Cooking, Ropework, Trail Skills, and Woods Tools. 3. All 6 True Freedom Trail Badges: Citizenship, Emergency Preparedness, Family Man, Outdoor Life, Personal Resources, and one Fitness Badge (Cycling, Fitness, Hiking, or Swimming). 4. Any 10 Elective Trail Badges of your choice: remaining published Elective Trail Badges, or Design Your Own Badges.

Servant Service

5. Complete 20 hours of service for each program year as an Adventurer.

Freedom Experience (complete one of the following):

6a. Complete at least 2 Freedom Experiences since becoming an Adventurer. 6b. Waive Freedom Experience Requirement (option available until July 1, 2024).

Troop Involvement

7. Maintain a level of in-uniform Troop meeting attendance acceptable to your Advisor (typically 60% or better). 8. Since becoming an Adventurer, participate in at least 6 Troop activities, not including regular meetings, for each year as an Adventurer. (Alternatively, if earning this before July 1, 2024, check this item to waive troop activity requirement).

Leadership

9. Since earning the previous rank, complete one of the following leadership options: 9a. As an Adventurer, serve as a First Officer, Second Officer, Quartermaster, Patrol Leader, or other Troop-approved leadership role for a minimum of six months. 9b. At five Troop meetings or outings, demonstrate your leadership ability by planning and instructing a Woodlands Trail patrol in significant skills approved by your Advisor and the Woodlands Trail Ranger. 9c. At five Troop meetings or outings, demonstrate your leadership ability by planning and instructing a Navigators or Adventurers patrol in significant Trail Badge skills approved by your Advisor, Trail Guide, and, if applicable, the Navigators Trailmaster. 9d. Plan and implement a Troop or patrol camping or high adventure trip including the program, food, and wilderness travel plans (biking, hiking, paddle craft, etc.) approved by your Advisor. 9e. Plan and implement an Adventurers-only high adventure or extended travel experience including the program, food, and travel plans approved by your Advisor. 9f. Plan and implement a Troop-wide or patrol service project approved by your Advisor.

Review

10. Successfully complete an Advancement Conference in uniform. 11. Successfully complete a Board of Review in uniform.

Cycling

** A certified bicycle helmet is required and must be worn for each ride completed for this badge. This Trail Badge, awarded to an Adventurer Trailman on completion of the requirements, is affixed to the Trailman's Troop Standard. A certified bicycle helmet is required and must be worn for each ride completed for this badge.

Do all requirements (1-8).

1. Discuss why keeping your body healthy and strong is important to you and God and list examples of ways it is possible to spend too much time on exercise, sports, or physical training. 2. Read 1 Timothy 4:8 and explain the value of “training the body” in relation to godliness. 3. Complete the following about cycling basics: a. Learn how to determine the proper seat height and bike height. b. Learn about different sizes and types of tires and when they might be used. c. Discuss the different types of bicycles. d. Compare the cost between different types of bikes. e. Discuss what type of clothing, shoes, or equipment should be worn while cycling. f. Discuss where it is proper and improper to go cycling. g. Explain the traffic laws for bicycles in your state. Compare them with motor vehicle laws. 4. Do the following requirements on cycling nutrition: a. Discuss the types of foods and beverages that should be consumed before, during, and after a long bike ride. b. Go on a long bike ride consuming those foods and beverages. Afterward, discuss with your patrol any modifications you would make to the types of foods and beverages you prepared. 5. Go on a ride with others including your leader and demonstrate the following: a. Mounting, dismounting, steering, pedaling, stopping, and hand signals b. Proper riding location on the side of the road and along parked cars c. Gearing, pedaling on ascents and descents, and emergency stops d. Turns, turn signals, left turn from the center of the street, and the alternate left turn (box) technique e. Crossing of streets and railroad tracks and avoiding obstacles 6. Demonstrate how to perform basic bicycle repairs: a. Inflating tires b. Repairing and/or replacing a tire c. Replacing a chain on the sprocket d. Adjusting brakes e. Raising and lowering the seat 7. Make a bicycle repair kit for your rides that includes those items necessary to make the repairs listed in the previous requirement. 8. Outline a training plan of three months to one year for improving your fitness using one of the options below (Do one: 8a, 8b, or 8c). NOTE: Your training plan should include progressive improvement goals and frequency schedule for practice. It must be based on your ability and take into account your current cycling fitness. It must be approved by your leader. 8a. Option: Road Biking: Using a map of your area, plan and take 10 rides with your leader’s approval. Map out your course and plan for rest stops. Identify possible problem areas before riding and determine how you will minimize them. The first ride must be at least 5 miles, and you must work up to a final ride of at least 50 miles. Each ride must take place on a separate day and must be completed in one day. 8b. Option: Off-road Biking: Using trail maps, map your course and execute 10 off-road rides with your leader’s approval. Identify possible problem areas before riding and determine how to minimize them. The first ride must be at least 2 miles, and you must work up to a final ride of at least 20 miles. Each ride must take place on a separate day and must be completed in one day. 8c. Option: Track Cycling, Cyclo-cross, or Para-Cycling: Develop a goal for a cycling event or events based on your current average time and desired improvement, then complete the event. It must be approved by your leader.

Fitness

**
This Trail Badge, awarded to an Adventurer Trailman on completion of the requirements, is affixed to the Trailman's Troop Standard.

Do all requirements (1-6).

1. Discuss why keeping your body healthy and strong is important to you and God and list examples of ways it is possible to spend too much time on exercise, sports, or physical training. 2. Read 1 Timothy 4:8 and explain the value of “training the body” in relation to godliness. 3. Research exercises to improve your physical fitness including stretches, strength training and cardiovascular activities. Know the safety guidelines for each activity and at what age it is safe to start them. Make note of each of the exercises, and what muscle or muscle group is being targeted. 4. Discuss what types of foods and beverages should be consumed before and after a hard workout. 5. Know how to check and figure your heart rate and know why it is important. 6. Outline a training plan of at least three months but no longer than one year for improving your fitness based on your research. NOTE: Your training plan should include progressive improvement goals and frequency schedule for practice. It must include strength training goals, cardiovascular training goals, and warm-up and cool-down activities, and cover all major muscle groups. Once it has been approved by your leader and your parents, implement your training plan.

Hiking

Because it is written with a mature preparation for manhood, True Freedom Trail Badges are to be earned only by registered Adventurer Trailmen.
This Trail Badge, awarded to an Adventurer Trailman on completion of the requirements, is affixed to the Trailman's Troop Standard.
Do all requirements (1-8).
Discuss why keeping your body healthy and strong is important to you and God and list examples of ways it is possible to spend too much time on exercise, sports, or physical training. 2. Read 1 Timothy 4:8 and explain the value of “training the body” in relation to godliness. 3. Review the Hikers Code. (See The Trailman’s Handbook) 4. Research the proper food for extended hiking outings. Research the amount of food and water necessary for extended hiking outings. 5. Review other items needed in your pack for an all day hike. 6. Research exercises, stretches, and aerobic activities designed specifically for hiking conditioning. 7. Prepare a hiking fitness and training plan of at least three months to prepare you for increasing hike lengths based on your research and review it with your leader. Include a training schedule and plans for warm-up, stretching, hiking, or other conditioning and a cool down. 8. Complete a progressive hiking program consisting of at least 10 hikes beginning at 5 miles for the first hike and increasing to at least a 20 mile hike. NOTE: Prepare a hiking plan for each hike using the Hikers Code including a trail map or route. Provide it to your leader before each trip. Hikes must be completed in one day and all 10 hikes must be completed in one year. Make sure you take into account temperatures, humidity, and other factors that could prove dangerous for hiking. (Log your hiking trips in The Trailman’s Handbook)

Swimming

Because it is written with a mature preparation for manhood, True Freedom Trail Badges are to be earned only by registered Adventurer Trailmen.
This Trail Badge, awarded to an Adventurer Trailman on completion of the requirements, is affixed to the Trailman's Troop Standard.

Do all of the following requirements (1-6)

1. Discuss why keeping your body healthy and strong is important to you and God and list examples of ways it is possible to spend too much time on exercise, sports, or physical training. 2. Read 1 Timothy 4:8 and explain the value of “training the body” in relation to godliness. 3. Research exercises to improve your swimming fitness including stretches, strength training, and conditioning drills. 4. Discuss what types of foods and beverages should be consumed before and after a swimming workout. How much should you eat and drink, and why? 5. Learn and explain the different strokes used in competitive swimming. Learn how improvements to your stroke, kick, and turns can improve your fitness and speed. 6. Outline a training plan of three months to one year using one of the options below (Do one: 6a, 6b, or 6c). Your training plan should include progressive improvement goals and frequency schedule for practice. It must be based on your ability and take into account your current swimming fitness. It must be approved by your leader. 6a. Time Option: Improve your USA Swimming Motivational Time Standard for your age for a specific stroke or strokes (e.g. BB to A). 6b. Event Option: Develop a goal for a swim event(s) based on your current average time and desired improvement (e.g. Go from 1:05 in the 100M Free to below 1 minute). 6c. Endurance Option: Build up endurance to be able to swim a specific distance in a time agreed upon by your leader (e.g. Swim a mile in under 30 minutes).j

Worthy life award

When you order the award, be sure to order the adhesive crosses which are sold separately in packs of 10 in the store.
You only need to ever order one Worthy Life Award per Trailmen even if they earn it at multiple levels.
Working with an adult mentor who is approved by your parent or guardian and your Advisor, complete an individualized or group discipleship program with a minimum duration of three months. All meetings with your adult mentor should be attended by you along with one or more peers, a parent, or family member. A minimum of two adults should be present at each meeting.
The program of at least three months includes regular meetings with your adult mentor for discussion and prayer and including the following three activities:

Devotional Activity

Complete one (1) of the following activities and discuss it with your mentor:

1. An age-appropriate Bible study program consisting of at least twelve (12) one-hour sessions. 2. The Band of Brothers Group Bible Study/Discipleship Program with a minimum duration of three (3) months.

Discipleship Activity

Complete one (1) of the following activities and discuss it with your mentor:

1. Read a Christian book . 2. Participate in a Christian weekend retreat or mission trip. 3. Complete a service project using the Biblical principles or skills developed during your Devotional Activity.

Disciplines Activities

Complete three (3) of the following activities during your Devotional and Discipleship Activities:

1. Keep a Bible study journal of questions, principles, and thoughts. 2. Memorize and recite scriptures, prayers, hymns, creeds, or catechisms. 3. Keep a prayer journal, including answers to prayers. 4. Regularly attend services/mass at your local church. 5. Volunteer to serve with your local church/parish on an ongoing basis. 6. Share/explain the Gospel to at least ten people individually.

Demonstration Activities

Complete all three (3) of the following activities:

1. Publicly share your personal testimony or Christian walk with your Troop or Bible study group. 2. Make a significant presentation to your Troop or Patrol including important concepts learned during your activities. 3. Hold a final conference with your Adventurer Advisor, Troop Chaplain, and mentor, explaining what you have experienced and learned and how you have achieved your pre-determined goals, tasks, and expectations.

Adventure Service Star

Complete 20 hours of service. This gold Adventurer Service Star goes on the Trailman's Standard.

TLUSA Band of Brothers

Participate in a Trail Life USA Band of Brothers for a year with regular attendance (grades 9-12). This participation patch is not yet available to order from the Trail Life USA Store.

Freedom Award

The Freedom Award can not be purchased in the Trail Life USA Store and will not appear on your order. It is only available after all the paperwork is submitted as outlined on the Freedom Award Procedure Guide and the Award has been approved by the Home Office.

Prerequisite Work

1. Must be a registered Adventurer who has earned the Horizon Rank.

Freedom Experiences

Complete a total of 4 Trail Life USA-approved Freedom Experiences as an Adventurer, satisfying the major and minor requirements. 2. Complete two Freedom Experiences in one field for your major. 3. Complete one Freedom Experience in a second field (this counts as a minor). 4. Complete one Freedom Experience in a third field (this counts as a minor).

Troop Involvement

5. Maintain a level of Troop meeting attendance acceptable to your Trailmaster (typically 60% or better) 6. Participate in at least 16 Troop activities since becoming an Adventurer, not including regular meetings.

Worthy Life Award

7. Complete the Adventurers Worthy Life Award

Servant Leadership Project

8. Complete a Freedom Servant Leadership Project according to the standards in the Servant Leadership Project Guide.

Mark Your Progress

9. Successfully complete an Advancement Conference with your Advisor and Troopmaster. 10. Successfully complete a Freedom Award Board of Review.

Home Office Approval

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