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Triangles,2x2s, and 360s

a collection of 2x2s, triangles of {you name it} and 360° frameworks
Last edited 55 days ago by Mallory Smyth
Remember ? or the ? I believe that everything in life can be distilled down to a 2x2 matrix, some triangle-tradeoff view, or a 360(ish) framework. Hoping that by sharing these resources (collated from many different sources), others can benefit from them as well - and maybe get a bit of a chuckle out of them 🤭
Happen across something not listed below? .
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Johari’s Window
Johari's Window is a simple but powerful tool used to help individuals understand their relationships with others and themselves. Here are some key points to keep in mind: The window is divided into four quadrants: open, hidden, blind, and unknown. The open quadrant represents things that you know about yourself and that others know about you. The hidden quadrant represents things that you know about yourself but that others do not know. The blind quadrant represents things that others know about you but that you do not know about yourself. The unknown quadrant represents things that neither you nor others know about you. The goal is to expand the open quadrant while reducing the size of the hidden, blind, and unknown quadrants. This can be achieved through honest communication and feedback from others, as well as by engaging in self-reflection and introspection.
Eisenhower Matrix
The Eisenhower Matrix, also known as the Urgent-Important Matrix, is a time management tool that helps individuals prioritize tasks based on their urgency and importance. Here's a summarized breakdown of the Eisenhower Matrix in five bullet-pointed paragraphs: Concept Overview: The matrix is divided into four quadrants to help individuals or teams prioritize tasks. It categorizes tasks based on two criteria: urgency and importance. The matrix helps in making decisions on what tasks need immediate attention and which ones can be scheduled for later. Quadrant 1 (Urgent and Important): Tasks in this quadrant are both urgent and important, requiring immediate attention. These are often crises, deadlines, or problems that need to be addressed right away. Managing these tasks efficiently helps in preventing additional stress and potential crises in the future. Quadrant 2 (Not Urgent but Important): Tasks in this quadrant are important but not urgent, allowing for them to be scheduled for a later time. These often relate to long-term goals, planning, and relationship-building. Spending more time in this quadrant can lead to a reduction in urgent and important tasks over time. Quadrant 3 (Urgent but Not Important): Tasks in this quadrant are urgent but not important, often appearing as interruptions or distractions. They may seem like they require immediate attention but don’t contribute significantly towards achieving long-term goals. Delegating or minimizing time spent on these tasks can lead to better time management. Quadrant 4 (Neither Urgent nor Important): Tasks in this quadrant are neither urgent nor important and are often considered as time-wasters. They don’t contribute towards achieving long-term goals and often take away time that could be spent on more important tasks. Identifying and eliminating or reducing time spent on these tasks can lead to improved productivity and focus on higher-priority tasks.
Impact v. Effort
The Impact/Effort Matrix is a tool used in decision-making, prioritization, and time management. Here's a summary of its key points: Two-Dimensional Analysis: The matrix is divided into four quadrants based on two criteria: impact and effort. Impact: This axis measures the potential benefits or positive effects a task or project will have once completed. Effort: This axis gauges the amount of work, time, or resources required to complete a task or project. Quadrants: Quick Wins (High Impact, Low Effort): Tasks in this quadrant are prioritized as they yield significant benefits with minimal effort. Major Projects (High Impact, High Effort): These tasks also provide significant benefits but require substantial effort, making them secondary to Quick Wins. Fill-Ins (Low Impact, Low Effort): These tasks are lower in priority but can be addressed as they require little effort. Thankless Tasks (Low Impact, High Effort): These tasks are usually avoided or deprioritized due to their high effort and low reward ratio. Prioritization: By plotting tasks or projects on the matrix, individuals or teams can visually prioritize them based on their potential impact and required effort, leading to more informed decision-making and better allocation of resources. Time Management: This matrix helps in managing time effectively by focusing on high-impact, low-effort tasks first, ensuring that efforts align with goals and yield meaningful results. Resource Allocation: It aids in the optimal distribution of resources by highlighting where the effort will result in the most significant impact. The Impact/Effort Matrix is a straightforward yet powerful tool for making more informed decisions, managing time effectively, and allocating resources optimally.
Pain v. Frequency
3 Drivers of Trust
According to Frances Frei, trust has three components: authenticity, logic, and empathy. When all three components are working, trust is great. However, if any one of the three components gets shaky, trust is threatened
Defining an MVP
Career Trajectory Canvas
Iron Triangle of Project Management
The Iron Triangle in project management refers to the critical constraints of scope, time, and cost that are interlinked and impact the overall quality of a project. Scope: This refers to the specific goals, deliverables, and tasks required to complete the project. Time: This constraint involves the schedule or deadlines for the project. Cost: This encompasses the budget or resources available for the project. Balancing these constraints is crucial for project success, as adjusting one aspect of the triangle will inevitably affect the others. For instance, expanding the scope may require more time and cost, while reducing the budget may necessitate a reduction in scope or an extension in time.
Woedtke’s OKR 4 Square
Key actions this week (no more than 3 P1s) + who owns OKRs confidence levels + WoW ∆ health metrics (stoplight grading) Upcoming 4w, key things team should be aware of
PM Delegation
X-axis is the PMs own confidence level on a decision and on the Y-axis is the impact to the business (positive or negative) of that decision.
Experimental Testing
Feedback Triangle
Ever wonder how intstant feedback should impact (or not!) your year-end performance review? The above diagram helps lay-out how it all ties together.
Bug 🐜 Prioritization
Finding Product Market Fit
Role of a PM
Unique v Value
When to listen to your customer
Johari’s Window
Related Topics
Personal Development
The View
johari.png
About this
Johari's Window is a simple but powerful tool used to help individuals understand their relationships with others and themselves. Here are some key points to keep in mind:
The window is divided into four quadrants: open, hidden, blind, and unknown.
The open quadrant represents things that you know about yourself and that others know about you.
The hidden quadrant represents things that you know about yourself but that others do not know.
The blind quadrant represents things that others know about you but that you do not know about yourself.
The unknown quadrant represents things that neither you nor others know about you.
The goal is to expand the open quadrant while reducing the size of the hidden, blind, and unknown quadrants.
This can be achieved through honest communication and feedback from others, as well as by engaging in self-reflection and introspection.
Framework Type
2x2

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