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Personal Growth

🤝 About Me - Bio

In many professional settings and communications - such as at conferences or in warm intro emails - a short bio is useful in giving readers an overview of who you are and what you’re passionate about. Bios are typically written in third-person. You might want to several versions of a bio (that speak to separate interests and goals) for different circumstances. Feel free to delete this text and and example once you’ve written your own bio (s)
Example: Audrey is Minerva Schools new grad passionate about helping purpose-driven companies find their brand-audience fit. She's worked in strategy internships at both large agencies and boutique studios across New York, Shanghai, and Berlin, and also has experience in UX design and strategy consulting. The values guiding both her professional and personal life are curiosity and authenticity. In college, she studied (and immersed in local coffee culture) in seven countries across four years, gaining a global perspective on consumer behavior, interactions, and design. She majored in Business and minored in Behavioral Science.
Template: [Name] is a [major] student at [college] passionate about [what you want to do in your career]. [Summarize key past experiences/projects/goals, focusing on those you can easily speak about]. In [his/her/their] free time, [your hobbies or interests].

❣️ My Core Values

Your values are what’s important to you, and they often apply both personally and professionally. Achieving these values or living a value-aligned way will likely make you happy, while lacking those values in your life can lead to frustration and dissatisfaction. If you’re not sure what those are, or , along with some reflection and introspection, can provide some clarity. Values can also change over time.
[List your top 3-4 values here].

How big-picture aspirations and values inform your career:

Think about what you'd love to do, big-picture. Consider how these overarching goals and your values can map into more specific actions. Each actions, in turn, maps to/hints at a field or function that might be exciting or fulfilling to you.
Big picture, I want to:
This entails...
Relevant fields/functions
1
Example: share passions with similarly-minded people
Continuous exploration and expression of my passions
Developing ways of creating communities around interests
Communication/writing
Product design
2
Example: create interesting things; use creativity to make people’s lives better
Designing solutions and experiences that add value
Ideating randomly/consistently
Articulating new thoughts & insights
Design
Psychology
Writing
3
There are no rows in this table
⏫ Skills to Develop
0
Skill
Current Proficiency
Desired Proficiency
1
Example: CSS
2
Example: Brand Strategy
3
Example: Communication
There are no rows in this table
📚 Reading List
0
Book/Article/Resource Title
By
Author
Finished?
Key Takeaways
Key takeaways
Title
By
Author
Finished?
Key Takeaways
-
Title
By
Author
Finished?
Key Takeaways
-

🔗 Helpful Links

and - these two exercises can help you clarify your core values, if you don’t already know what they are. Even if you do, doing the exercises may challenge you to re-examine what is important to you.
- an essay by Y Combinator’s Paul Graham on how to find a meaningful, fulfilling career.
Also if you’re young and confused: - an essay originally written for a high school talk. In it, he talks about the importance of curiosity and trying different things.
- a core values-driven approach to seeking and assessing opportunities
- this psychometric personality test may provide insight into what your strengths are. While not directly related to professional development, it might reflect your values and/or highlight how you approach prioritization and decision-making.
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