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W23 MAD 5234 s1 LA 4, 5

You can write about any topics of interest.
Here are some ideas from our class lectures:

Some further topics below:
TWO LEARNING ACTIVITIES WORTH 6% EACH OF YOUR FINAL GRADE
How to do these Learning Activities:

Take any 2 topics discussed in class
Write them up as linked in Articles
Make a text file named StudentName_StudentID.txt
In that text file, put the URLs of your Linked In Articles.


What you are to do:
Take 2 topics or case studies and talk about how you as a software project manager would approach managing the testing and quality assurance of this kind of technology.

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A comprehensive description of Unified Process including user stories, the Requirements Document, Use Cases as a business process discovery tool, unified modeling language diagrams to realize the system design, and the traceability matrix
The Unified Process (UP) is a software development methodology that is divided into four distinct phases: Inception, Elaboration, Construction and Transition. Each of these phases is further divided into smaller iterations, which allows for incremental development and delivery of the software.
Inception phase: The initial phase of the UP, where the project scope is defined and a high-level plan for the project is created. User stories are used to capture the high-level requirements of the project and to help define the scope of the project. A Requirements Document is also created to capture the full set of requirements for the project. Additionally, Use Cases are used as a business process discovery tool to understand the business processes that the software will support.
Elaboration phase: In this phase, the project requirements are defined in more detail, and a more detailed plan for the project is created. User stories are further refined and expanded upon in this phase, as the project requirements are defined in more detail. The Requirements Document is also updated to reflect the more detailed requirements. Use Cases are also refined to reflect the more detailed understanding of the business processes.
Construction phase: The bulk of the software development work is done in this phase, where the software is actually built and tested. User stories are used as the basis for the software development work done in this phase. They are used to guide the development of the software and to ensure that the software meets the requirements defined in the previous phases. Unified Modeling Language (UML) diagrams are used to represent the system design and to communicate the design to the development team. The traceability matrix is also constructed during this phase, to ensure that all of the requirements defined in the user stories are satisfied by the design and implementation of the software.
Transition phase: The final phase of the UP, where the software is deployed and handed over to the customer for use. User stories are used to ensure that the software meets the requirements of the customer and is ready for deployment. The traceability matrix is also used to ensure that all of the requirements are satisfied before the software is deployed.
Overall, the UP is a comprehensive methodology that uses user stories, Requirements Document, Use Cases, UML diagrams, and the traceability matrix as key tools to ensure that the software being developed meets the requirements, is designed correctly, and is ready for deployment.

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The Unified Process (UP) is a software development methodology that is divided into four distinct phases: Inception, Elaboration, Construction and Transition. Each of these phases is further divided into smaller iterations, which allows for incremental development and delivery of the software.
Inception phase: The initial phase of the UP, where the project scope is defined and a high-level plan for the project is created. User stories are used to capture the high-level requirements of the project and to help define the scope of the project. A Requirements Document is also created to capture the full set of requirements for the project. Additionally, Use Cases are used as a business process discovery tool to understand the business processes that the software will support.
Elaboration phase: In this phase, the project requirements are defined in more detail, and a more detailed plan for the project is created. User stories are further refined and expanded upon in this phase, as the project requirements are defined in more detail. The Requirements Document is also updated to reflect the more detailed requirements. Use Cases are also refined to reflect the more detailed understanding of the business processes.
Construction phase: The bulk of the software development work is done in this phase, where the software is actually built and tested. User stories are used as the basis for the software development work done in this phase. They are used to guide the development of the software and to ensure that the software meets the requirements defined in the previous phases. Unified Modeling Language (UML) diagrams are used to represent the system design and to communicate the design to the development team. The traceability matrix is also constructed during this phase, to ensure that all of the requirements defined in the user stories are satisfied by the design and implementation of the software.
Transition phase: The final phase of the UP, where the software is deployed and handed over to the customer for use. User stories are used to ensure that the software meets the requirements of the customer and is ready for deployment.
The traceability matrix is also used to ensure that all of the requirements are satisfied before the software is deployed.
In the Unified Process (UP), a traceability matrix is a tool used to ensure that the software being developed meets the requirements defined in the earlier phases of the UP. It is typically used to trace the relationship between the user stories, which represent the functional requirements of the software, and the design and implementation of the software.
The traceability matrix is typically constructed during the construction phase of the UP. It is a table that lists all of the user stories on one axis and the design and implementation elements on the other axis. The cells in the table indicate the relationship between the user story and the design or implementation element.
The traceability matrix is used to ensure that all of the requirements defined in the user stories are satisfied by the design and implementation of the software. It also helps to identify any missing or incomplete requirements, and to ensure that changes to the software are reflected in the requirements.
The Traceability Matrix also helps to track the progress of the development effort and to ensure that all of the requirements are satisfied before the software is deployed.
Overall, the traceability matrix is a key tool for ensuring that the software being developed meets the requirements and that the requirements are correctly implemented, also it helps to ensure that the software is developed on time and within budget.
The traceability matrix serves additional purposes beyond ensuring that the software meets the requirements defined in the user stories.
One important use of the traceability matrix is to identify any dead execution paths, that is, methods or code that do not serve to deliver any requirements of the system. This is achieved by identifying the intersection of user stories and design elements in the matrix. When a method or piece of code is not linked to any user story, it is considered a dead execution path and can be removed from the codebase as it is not serving any functional purpose.
Additionally, the traceability matrix can be used to create test cases. When a user story is linked to a design element in the matrix, the intersection point can be used to create test cases that ensure that the design element satisfies the requirements of the user story.
In summary, the traceability matrix is a powerful tool that helps to ensure that the software being developed meets the requirements defined in the user stories, it also helps to identify and remove dead execution paths and create test cases.
The Unified Process is a comprehensive methodology that uses user stories, Requirements Document, Use Cases, UML diagrams, and the traceability matrix as key tools to ensure that the software being developed meets the requirements, is designed correctly, and is ready for deployment.
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