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Exercise: Discover your networth
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Exercise: Discover your networth

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Step 1 - Existing Relationships
🚧 The first step is to write down the people with whom you interact. These can be your friends, family members, or colleagues. Just write down as many names as you can remember. Most people quickly come up with 3 to 5 names and struggle to have a list of 15 names. Aim to have eight names. The only information you need right now is their name.

In your first table, the heading of your first column will be ‘Name’. As said above, you can add more information. Best not to make it too complex at the beginning.

The column Activity and Total will be completed in step 3. It is a linked column.


Take it to the next level.
While the names of your connection are the only necessary information you should write down in this step, you can add more detail. For example, you can add a qualifier to the relationship (acquaintance, friend, true friend, family member, colleague), how you are (predominantly) interacting (online vs. offline). You could also add where you first met and if you have shared friends.
Often, when scientists use this type of exercise, they also note down how often people meet each other. The reasoning is that frequency of interaction is used to measure trust. Of course, it isn’t a perfect measure of trust, but it indicates how much effort you put into the friendship.


Existing Relationships
0
Name
Activity
Total 2
1
Anton
Running
1
2
Bert
Reading
1
3
Camilia
Running
Reading
Rowing
Camping
Clowning
5
There are no rows in this table
Step 2 - Hobbies, expertise, and activities
🚧 Now focus on yourself and make a list of activities you enjoy doing or topics you like chatting. You can also include information (advice, tips) you seek out often. For example, if you are a new parent, you could include ‘parenting’.

In your second table, create a list of the activities you are doing. Again, make it as complex as you want.

The column Existing Relationships and Total will be completed in Step 3.


Take it to the next level
For each activity or expertise field, you can add how important it is. An activity could be crucial for your family, well-being, and career success.

Activities
0
Activity
Existing Relationships
Total
1
Running
Anton
Camilia
2
2
Reading
Bert
Camilia
2
3
Rowing
Camilia
1
4
Camping
Camilia
1
5
Clowning
Camilia
1
There are no rows in this table
Step 3 - Combine your people and your activities
🚧 In step 3, you combine your first and second tables to get an overview with whom you are doing an activity or who can help you with something. For each person, indicate their expertise or if they do a specific activity.

In Coda, you can link your tables using the column property Lookup (Coda). Scroll back up to table 1 (People) and add the activities each person is involved in or their field of expertise. Table 2 (Activities) will be auto-filled.


Taking it to the next level
For each activity or expertise field you can add how important this activity is for the person or how good he/she is at it. You’ll have to modify the tables to only allow one entry in the lookup column or use a matrix format (see the for an example)

Actions you can take when looking at the table People:
Use this table when you are picking a present for someone
Suggest a (new) activity for someone
Get someone to do something new.
Pick someone you haven’t seen for a while and invite them to do whatever they enjoy doing.

Actions you can take when looking at the table Activities:
For an activity you haven’t done for a while, reach out to linked people and ask if you can meet.
Pick an activity you are currently struggling with and ask for help

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