Mental health

Loss

Two things prevent us from happiness; living in past and observing others.
What is grief?
Grief is generally described as the overwhelming sadness and pain caused by the loss of a loved one. Grief is a personal experience, so there is no one way to experience it. The loss of a loved one is life's most stressful event and can cause a major emotional crisis. Job loss, and loss of independence through a disability are some instigators of grief.
Signs and Symptoms
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Behavior
Feelings
Thoughts
Physical
1
Lack of motivation to do daily tasks
Intense sorrow
"I don’t deserve to be happy.”
Fatigue
2
Isolating from friends and/or family
Detachment or numbness
"Am I normal?”
Trouble sleeping
3
Extreme focus or avoidance of reminders of loss
Guilt
"If it weren’t for me...” or “If only I did this instead.”
Headaches
4
Unable to fully accept loss
Pain / sadness
“Life’s not worth living without them”
Weakened immune system
5
Anger
"I hate myself.”
Loss of appetite
6
Resentment
7
Anxiety
8
Distrust
9
Humiliation
10
Yearning/despair
11
Denial / disbelief
12
Confusion/shock
There are no rows in this table
Ways to Cope
Just like there are many ways to experience grief, there are many ways of coping.
Here are some:
Maintain or start a healthy routine
Exercise regularly (Physical activity can help relieve stress, depression and anxiety)
Eat a healthy diet (Try new recipes or learn how to cook, while you’re at it!)
Get enough sleep (8-10 hours for teens and 7-9 hours for adults)
Find hobbies and learn new skills to distract yourself from the pain or reminders of loss
Practice stress-management and self care (e.g. meditating, journaling)
Allow yourself to feel whatever it is you are feeling at the moment (happy, sad, angry, or anything in between). Recognizing and freely expressing your emotions will allow for a smoother and healthier recovery period.
Find friends to talk to or a support group for grief. If you are religious, join your faith community.
Talk to your doctor if intense symptoms of grief persist after at least one year and interfere with daily activities.
Stay away from alcohol and recreational drugs as these can heighten pain and aren’t healthy ways to cope.
Accept that life is for the living. It takes effort to begin to live again in the present and not dwell on the past.
Postpone major life changes. Try to hold off on making any major changes, such as moving, remarrying, changing jobs or having another child. You should give yourself time to adjust to your loss.
Be patient. It can take months or even years to absorb a major loss and accept your changed life.
Seek outside help when necessary. If your grief seems like it is too much to bear, seek professional assistance to help work through your grief. It's a sign of strength, not weakness, to seek help.
How you can help others in grief -
If someone you care about has lost a loved one, you can help them through the grieving process.
Share the sorrow. Allow them, even encourage them , to talk about their feelings of loss and share memories of the deceased.
Don't offer false comfort. It doesn't help the grieving person when you say "it was for the best" or "you'll get over it in time." Instead, offer a simple expression of sorrow and take time to listen.
Offer practical help. Baby-sitting, cooking and running errands are all ways to help someone who is in the midst of grieving.
Be patient. Remember that it can take a long time to recover from a major loss. Make yourself available to talk.
Encourage professional help when necessary. Don't hesitate to recommend professional help when you feel someone is experiencing too much pain to cope alone.

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How to cope with reminders:
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When symptoms persist past 12 months:
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