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Vocabulary for the week

Stock market: It is a place where you can buy stocks or shares in a company and if the company grows, you can sell the shares and make money.
Bucket List: It is a list with everything you want to do before you die. It could be skydiving, going to a rock concert or whatever you want.
Pleasant: An action or object that is nice and enjoyable.
Ambitions: Your future goals or plans to move up in life. It could be getting a promotion, starting a successful business or anything that involves progressing professionally.
Financially savvy: Someone who is good at dealing with money and finance related things.
Scams: When someone lies to you in order to get your money.
Idioms
A penny saved is a penny earned. This means that not spending money is almost the same as earning it because it will still be in your pocket!
The best things in life are free. A similar saying is Money isn't everything, in other words money can't buy the most important things in life, like love or friendship or health.
Saving for a rainy day means putting away money for the future, or saving for an emergency.
Penny wise, pound foolish. This expression describes a person who is extremely careful about spending small amounts of money, but careless when it comes to larger sums.
A fool and his money are soon parted. This proverb reminds us that foolish people do not know how to hold on to their money!
Early to bed and early to rise, makes a man healthy, wealthy and wise. This is a famous saying of Benjamin Franklin, meaning if you go to sleep early and wake up early you can get rich!
Money doesn't grow on trees. This expression means that money is not easily obtained. Parents frequently tell their children this if they constantly want to buy things!
Money talks. This is a modern expression which means that money is powerful, or that money makes things happen.
In for a penny, in for a pound. This proverb has come to mean that if you start something you may as well finish it, even if you have to devote much more effort than you expected. The original meaning was that if the punishment is the same, people will commit the offence which brings the greatest profit.

champagne on a beer budget
Someone who likes expensive things that they cannot afford has champagne taste on a beer budget.
"Eve borrows money to buy expensive designer clothes - champagne taste on a beer budget!"

cheek by jowl
When people are cheek by jowl, they are crammed uncomfortably close together.
"The refugees are living cheek by jowl in a temporary camp."

keep up appearances
A person who keeps up appearances maintains an outward show of prosperity or well-being in order to hide their difficulties from others.
"He continued to keep up appearances even when business was bad."

keep up with the Joneses
Someone who tries to keep up with the Joneses tries to have the same possessions or social achievements as someone else.
"First the Browns moved their children to an expensive school. Now the Smiths have done the same. It's silly how some people feel they have to keep up with the Joneses!"

keep the wolf from the door
In order to keep the wolf from the door, you need to have enough money to buy food and other essentials.
"My grandparents earned barely enough money to keep the wolf from the door."

live beyond means
If someone lives beyond their means, they spend more money than they earn or can afford.
"The cost of living was so much higher in New York that he was soon living beyond his means."

live from hand to mouth
If you live from hand to mouth, you don't have any money to save because whatever you earn is spent on food and other essentials.
"Most families in that area live from hand to mouth."

live high off the hog
Someone who lives high off the hog has a lot of money and a very comfortable lifestyle.
"Now he's wealthy and living high off the hog."

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