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1980.gg: the Linktree for Esports
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Market Analysis

Market Overview

The aim of the market overview is to provide a current snapshot of the industry in order to better understand it. Do teams, players and gaming influencers have a website? Do they use a ‘link-in-bio’ tool? What are the links in their profiles on social media?

I reviewed dozens of teams, players and streamers. I started by checking Pro Gaming Teams and their digital presence:
Pro Gaming Teams
5
Name
Country / Region
Has a Website?
Link in Bio Tool
Website Link
Website Description
Mobile First
Twitter
Twitter Link in Bio
Instagram
IG Link in Bio
Twitch
Youtube
No results from filter

Some learning from the pro team data:

Websites are still a thing for pro esports teams, they all have one...
...But teams don’t seem to invest a lot on their website: some are outdated, others are quite simple.
I’m surprised by the prominence of the shopping experience of team apparels. Except the Indian team all of them have a shop. The website strategy is sometimes only focused on a shop, or the shop is in the front of the website. I noticed Shopify as the website technology provider a few times.
Vitality links their shop in their social media. It’s their digital gateway. In the shop footer, not easy to find, there is the “traditional” website link with the label “Institutional website”.
I’m happy to have found this mention: team website seems to be needed for communication to partner, sponsor, press, investor (and “boomer”...)
All teams have Twitter, Instagram and Youtube accounts. As well as a Twitch account but with three different strategies: a Twitch “User” profile, or a Twitch “Team” profile, or both.
6 teams are using a ‘link-in-bio’ tool on 23 teams in this list = 26%. Do the other teams don’t know this kind of tool or don’t they see the value?
Astralis is using a ‘link-in-bio’ tool called Linkfire which is targeting musicians and the music market. A song is effectively promoted on their Linkfire landing page.
Only NRG eSports is using their ‘link-in-bio’ tool on both Twitter and Instagram. The 5 others teams are using their link on only one of the two social networks.

Then, what about the pro players:
Pro Player
5
Name
Country / Region
Source
Has a Website?
Link in Bio Tool
Website Link
Website Description
Mobile First
Twitter
Twitter Link in Bio
Instagram
IG Link in Bio
Twitch
Youtube
Discord
12
Clem
France
Team Liquid SC2
No results from filter
Source: players of top teams found here


Some learning from the pro player data:

None of the pro players have a website. Social media won, sorry web agencies...
All pro players have Twitter and Twitch accounts, a lot an Instagram one. Pro players are clearly also (part) streamers.
No ‘link-in-bio’ tools but their Instagram or Twitch is linked on Twitter, and Twitter or Twitch on Instagram
. They try to grow their social media audience. Maybe an opportunity for me to create a solution to link their social media with other gaming oriented features (hardware, team infos, etc).
Fnatic gives short URLs to all of their players. They are redirecting to the Fnatic shop but each URL includes the player nickname, so they track the traffic coming from each of their players. Clever!

Let’s continue with the top streamers:
Top Streamer
5
Name
Country / Region
Source
Has a Website?
Link in Bio Tool
Website Link
Website Description
Mobile First
Twitter
Twitter Link in Bio
Instagram
IG Link in Bio
Twitch
Youtube
No results from filter

Some learning from the top streamer data:

Some top streamers have a website, notably the French ones (more info why below) but it’s clearly not a mandatory asset.
My supposition why French streamers are more willing to have a website: before the solo streamer trend, we used to have a lot of gaming WebTV in France (Millenium, Ogaming, Eclypsia, JVTV etc) partly created by classical web media. At that time, the digital presence was built around a website. So in France for a top streamer competing with the still existing WebTVs, it’s kind of obvious to have a website. The french audience may expect that.
All websites are really simple, promoting streamer merchandising shops and their Twitch embed.
All top streamers have Twitter, Instagram and Youtube accounts. Twitter is the most prominent social network (in addition to Twitch of course because I listed here only Twitch streamers). I had to check on Google to find some Instagram accounts who are not directly linked on the Twitch or Twitter profiles.
No streamers here are using a ‘link-in-bio’ tool which really surprises me because they all try to link their different social accounts.
Some Twitter bios are encumbered by their other social links (one or two in the description, another in the link).
Maybe they are just not aware of this kind of tool? A tool which provides a simple website / landing page, plus a way to link all their social networks seems to be a nice addition in their digital strategy.

We now have an idea of how top teams, players and streamers communicate on the internet and the social networks. Then, you can find my review of the long tail of the market: amateur teams and streamers who are obviously the most numerous and so my main targets.
Amateur Team
5
Name
Country / Region
Source
Has a Website?
Link in Bio Tool
Website Link
Website Description
Mobile First
Twitter
Twitter Link in Bio
Instagram
IG Link in Bio
Twitch
Youtube
Discord
3
Age d’Or
France
ESL PUBGM Mobile Tournament
5
Atlantes eSports
Mexico
ESEA (Intermediate league)
6
Chill Town
Canada
ESEA (Intermediate league)
7
Cryptova
ESEA
ESEA (Intermediate league)
8
Deftfox
Germany
ESEA (Intermediate league)
9
DOGO Clan
Italy
ESL R6 PS4 Italy League
11
eXploitgg
Portugal
ESEA (Intermediate league)
A merch shop.
13
GenOne
France
ESEA (Intermediate league)