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On Conviction and Importance

The Negation Game offers two types of responses:
Conviction which argues whether the point is true
Relevance which argues whether the point matters in this context

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By clicking the × you can disagree.

When you’re not convinced it’s the best alternative, you can click the × under Conviction and add an alternative.
When you think one alternative is overrated compared to one you prefer, click the × under relevance to add a counterpoint.

Here’s an example:
Point: The Earth is round
Alternative: The Earth is flat.
Counterpoint: Commercial flights regularly take routes that would be impossible on a flat Earth.
Counterpoint: The speed of light is faster than 10kph.
Counterpoint: The speed of light being faster than 10kph has nothing to do with the shape of the Earth.
Alternative: The Earth is an oblate spheroid.

And here’s that example as a tree of responses in the Negation Game:
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You can see that some of them have checks next to them. That’s because I agreed with them.
When you like the Relevance of a negation, you’re arguing that you think it matters in this context (whether or not you’re convinced by it).
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For example, “The Earth is flat.” clearly is relevant to the point “The Earth is round.”, whether or not you think it’s true.
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When you like the Conviction, of a negation, you’re arguing that you think it’s true (whether or not you think it’s relevant).
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For example, “The speed of light is faster than 10kph.” is clearly true, whether or not you you think it matters in the context of the point “The Earth is round.”

When you like both you’re saying you think it’s true and it matters.
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Top level points don’t have a Relevance attribute because they don’t have a parent that they apply to.
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In either case, you can either agree that it’s accurate or that it’s important:
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or disagree and make an argument why not:
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or propose an alternative:
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Writing points is a skill! What makes a good point? There are four rules of thumb:
It’s a statement
It contains one idea
If true, it makes the
parent false
It ends in a period

If you’re having trouble coming up with negations, it’s often useful to ask ChatGPT:
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It’s best to first come up with negations, and only then evaluate them for whether you think they are true. You’ll find that’s a very creative generative loop, first coming up with negations, then marking the ones you agree with, then trying to come up with new negations against them.

Once you do, you’ll be able to see what you’ve marked as accurate and important.

For example, here you can see that I believe that the Earth is round, that it’s relevant whether or not it’s flat, but that I don’t think it is flat, that the speed of light is faster than 10kph, but that that doesn’t matter because the speed of light being faster than 10kph has nothing to do with the shape of the Earth.
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Now go make good points!


What people are saying


I love this. So much more sane than a normal social media thread.

It’s fun to see what people are negating. Some points are interesting and worth discussing. Mostly thoughtful expanded arguments

Interesting! An idea marketplace vibes

I could hear my mental ram gearing up





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