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Vandibeek Pastoral Co Biosecurity Plan
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Property Details

1
Properties:
Kingston Station Narounyah and Dahlonega
2
PIC Number/s:
QJJI0160 & QEJI0110
3
J-BAS
7
4
Phone:
0429723626
5
Contact:
Ian Goodwin
6
Email:
tangostation@bigpond.com
7
Property Description
Kingston Station is an 24000 acre beef cattle breeding and fattening property located 72km north-east of Alpha.
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Vet Details

1
Veterinarian:
Dr. Steven Bliss
2
Clinic:
Gray Street Veterinary Clinic
3
Address:
43 Gray St, Emerald, 4720
4
Phone:
0429723626
5
Email:
graystreet@emeraldvet.com
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Plan Details

1
Date Created
03/11/2020
2
Last Modified
03/11/2020
3
Review Due
03/11/2021
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Signed:________________________________
Date:
Ian Goodwin

Signed:_________________________________
Date:
Dr Steven Bliss
BioCheck® is a program run by members of the Australian Cattle Veterinarians - a Special Interest Group of the Australian Veterinary Association Ltd.
This BioCheck® Biosecurity plan is designed to ensure that the farm has considered the major biosecurity risks and has appropriate risk management strategies in place. The plan is largely based on the generic Biosecurity Plans that are available from the Animal Health Australia, LPA and Farm Biosecurity web site, and should be read in conjunction with the resources that can be downloaded from there (http://www.farmbiosecurity.com.au).
This plan is not an audited quality assurance program nor is it a guarrantee against incursion by pests or disease. Rather it is evidence that the major biosecurity risks have been discussed and plans made to manage these which are appropriate to the individual farm.
Each risk has been discussed and evaluated as below. Where appropriate, comments have been included that describe how this property is managing the risks identified.

1.0 Farm Inputs

💡 Almost anything moved onto the property can be a potential source of pests and diseases for livestock and plants.
Monitor animals or plant materials that enter the property, as well as sources of water, feed, bedding and fertiliser.

1.1 Introducing new animals

Animals can carry diseases and pests without necessarily showing any signs, so it is important to manage the introduction of new animals carefully to avoid infecting the rest of your stock. Treating individual animals is cheaper and easier than managing a new disease in all stock on your property. Manage new and returning stock in a similar fashion.
Risk Name
Actions
status
Notes
Files
1
Appropriate Stock - NVD/Animal Health Declaration
Livestock will only be purchased from suppliers who have a food safety or quality assurance program and can provide information an Animal Health Declaration.
Animal Health Declarations will be kept for at least 7 years.
✅ Risk Controlled
2
Emptying out
Stock are held for 24-48 in the yards for emptying out.
✅ Risk Controlled
3
Pre-purchase examination of introduced stock
A pre-purchase examination of all introduced stock is made to ensure only healthy stock are introduced.
✅ Risk Controlled
4
Quarantine of introduced stock
Introduced stock must be quarrantined for a period of 21 days, or longer if disease test results are incomplete.
✅ Risk Controlled
5
Stock Disease Testing - Pestivirus endemic herd
Introduced stock must be quarrantined for a period of 21 days, or longer if disease test results are incomplete.
⚠️ Risk Partially Controlled
Will Test for pesti virus when doing fecal test, this year.
6
Stock leaving the farm for short periods
Stock leaving the farm for short periods (eg Agistment, shows etc) must be quarantined from the rest of the herd for a period of at least 7 days upon their return.
Any signs of disease in these stock must be immediatlely reported and stock should be examined by the farm vet before release from quarantine.
Transport vehicles must be kept clean and disinfected.
✅ Risk Controlled
7
Johne's Disease risk assessment
The introduction and movement of livestock must mininise the risk of JD.
Stock should have a J-BAS score that is not less than this farm.
Ensure that property of origin holds for all Cattle Health Declarations and ensure the CHD considers the risk of all properties during the lifetime of purchased stock.
Have the cattle had potential exposure to dairy animals or land? (The Dairy Assurance Score is equivalent to the J-BAS)
Is there evidence of JD suspicion or infection on the property?
Has there been any JD testing on the proprty of origin ?
Have the animals been vaccinated with Silirum ?
✅ Risk Controlled
No results from filter

1.2 Animal Feed

1.3 Water Sources

1.4 Organic Fertilizer

2.0 Farm Outputs

💡 Responsibility for biosecurity doesn’t end when plant products or animals leave the farm gate. The measures in place on your property support biosecurity in your region. You have an important role to play in protecting your region and the entire industry from biosecurity threats. Protect your reputation and your business – within a region, every farm may be affected in the event of a pest incursion or disease outbreak.

2.1 Moving Plants and animals off the property

If your animals are showing signs of disease, don’t spread it further.
Risk Name
Actions
status
Notes
Files
1
Fit to travel
Ensure animals are fit to travel, showing no signs of disease.
Fit to travel document/app
Ensure transport vehicle is clean prior to transport.
✅ Risk Controlled
2
Documentation
Ensure travel records are up to date
✅ Risk Controlled
3
Notification
Update the National Livestock Identification System database if moving cattle, sheep, goats or pigs.
✅ Risk Controlled
4
Shows, and sales
Ensure that only health animals are taken to shows, sales or markets., equipment, feed and water is not shared with livestock from other farms, avoid letting stock eat off the ground
✅ Risk Controlled
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3.0 People and Vehicles

💡 If it can move, it can carry diseases, pests and weeds. For this reason, people, vehicles and equipment pose a high biosecurity risk and should be managed accordingly.

3.1 Property Access

Multiple, unsecured entry points to your property make it difficult to control visitor access and manage high risk visitors such as those who visit multiple properties each day.
Risk Name
Actions
status
Notes
Files
1
Property Access
Limit the number of access points to the property (lock unused gates).
✅ Risk Controlled
2
Production Areas Access
Access to production areas (fields, paddocks or sheds) should be limited to a restricted range of personnel only.
Permission to access these areas should only be given following a risk assessment which will include a visual inspection of the vehicle for cleanliness.
✅ Risk Controlled
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3.2 Signage

Never assume that people know what to do when they arrive at your property. Without signage, visitors and staff may be unaware of the biosecurity procedures enforced on your property.

Risk Name
Actions
status
Notes
Files
1
Visitor area signage
Signs are used to direct all visitors to a designated parking area away from livestock or crops and ask them to report to management and sign a visitor register.
✅ Risk Controlled
2
Contact Details
Signs with mobile phone numbers of managers are clear and visible
✅ Risk Controlled
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3.3 Visitor Risk Assessment

Visitors can unknowingly carry diseases, pests and weeds on their clothes and personal items. The risk is greater if they’ve been in contact with other livestock or crops, or have recently been interstate or overseas. If you don’t know where visitors have come from or what they have been doing, it will be difficult to trace back or trace forward in the event of an incursion or disease outbreak.
Risk Name
Actions
status
Notes
Files
1
Visitor Risk Assessment
Conduct a risk assessment before you allow a visitor onto the property.
If you cannot reduce the risk, refuse entry to high risk visitors.
✅ Risk Controlled
2
Limit visitor contact
If required, provide learning equipment or a change of clothing or footwear to reduce the risk.
Limit access to and contact with crops and livestock, and eliminate any unnecessary contact altogether.
✅ Risk Controlled
3
Hygiene
Provide hand washing facilities, foot baths or alternative clothing and footwear for visitors to use while on-farm.
Ensure contractors and visitors in contact with stock wear clean overalls.
✅ Risk Controlled
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3.4 Equipment

Tools and equipment can carry diseases, pests and weeds seeds. The risk for disease spread is higher when equipment is borrowed, lent or bought second-hand from other properties.
Risk Name
Actions
status
Notes
Files
1
Disinfect Equipment
Clean and disinfect tools and equipment before and after use on crops or livestock.
Clean and disinfect equipment between between different batches, mobs or herds of animals.
Clean and disinfect second-hand, borrowed or lent equipment before and after use.
✅ Risk Controlled
2
Dedicated tools and order of use
Have dedicated tools, clothing and footwear available for use in production areas or on animals and plants affected by pests or disease.
Always work with sick animals last (work from clean to dirty).
✅ Risk Controlled
3
Storage area cleanliness
Clean and disinfect equipment storage areas regularly.
✅ Risk Controlled
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3.5 Vehicles

All parts of a vehicle can carry disease causing organisms, pests and weeds seeds. Without restricting parking and vehicle movements within the property, it is difficult to control and monitor the spread of diseases, pests and weeds
Risk Name
Actions
status
Notes
Files
1
Property access points
Encourage visitors to enter the property via one or two routes only.
Use signs to inform visitors about property access points.
✅ Risk Controlled
2
Property access notifications
Have a system in place to log visitors to the property.
✅ Risk Controlled
3
Vehicle access and parking
Minimise the number of vehicles you allow onto the property and restrict them to designated visitor parking areas.
Monitor areas next to parking facilities for signs of diseases, pests and weeds.
Not all vehicles need to access production areas. It may be easier to have vehicles that are for use only on-farm.
If possible, use farm vehicles to transport visitors around the property.
✅ Risk Controlled
4
Vehicle wash areas
Provide a wash area for vehicles that need to enter production areas, or before moving crops or livestock.
If possible, use a high pressure wash down (or blow down) facility located well away from crops or livestock for cleaning vehicles and equipment.
For maximum protection, it is recommended that staff also disinfect after washing.
✅ Risk Controlled
5
Vehicle wash waste
Collect run-off from vehicle wash areas in a sump, or direct it away from production areas.
Monitor areas next to cleaning facilities for signs of pests and diseases, and treat weeds before setting seed or becoming established.
✅ Risk Controlled
6
Road and track contamination
Ask visitors to stay on established roads or tracks.
Check areas next to roads and tracks for signs of diseases, pests and weeds, and treat before becoming established monthly.
✅ Risk Controlled
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4.0 Production Practices

Good on-farm hygiene reduces the risk of spreading pests and diseases. Implement simple hygiene practices for feed and water, product packaging, storage facilities, livestock husbandry, waste materials and plant propagation activities.

4.1 Water Management

Risk Name
Actions
status
Notes
Files
1
Algal Bloom Risk
Prevent algal blooms by aerating or treating water that is high in nutrients and is stored in dams.
✅ Risk Controlled
2
Recycled Water
Where possible, use drip irrigation for recycled water to avoid aerosol formation.
↔️ Risk unimportant
3
Waste Water Dams
Make sure livestock cannot drink from waste water storage dams.
↔️ Risk unimportant
4
Effluent Irrigation
Prevent young and vulnerable livestock from grazing pastures irrigated with recycled effluent during the ‘withholding period’ after each irrigation.
↔️ Risk unimportant
5
Water Troughs
Clean water troughs regularly to prevent the build-up of contaminants.
Implement a cleaning roster to ensure they are always clean.
Provide cover for animal feed and water where possible.
keep the troughs high enough so they cannot be contaminated by animal faeces.
✅ Risk Controlled
No results from filter

4.2 Animal Manure and Waste

Risk Name
Actions
status
Notes
Files
1
Carcass disposal
Dispose of animal carcasses and waste as soon as practical in a segregated area that cannot be accessed by livestock, or wild and feral animals. ⁠
Select disposal areas to avoid the potential spread of contaminants by water, wind or animals.⁠
Where practical, dispose of carcases immediately in a way that takes into account environmental and public considerations (e.g. burning, burial or composting).⁠
Mark disposal sites on property map.
✅ Risk Controlled
2
Effluent Disposal
Manage effluent dispersal to minimise disease spread through the contamination of pastures, stockfeed and water.
Maintain grazing intervals (21 days) between applications of these materials to paddocks and grazing of livestock.
↔️ Risk unimportant
3
Legal obligations
Always ensure you are adhering to government and industry requirements for carcase, effluent and waste management.
✅ Risk Controlled
4
Waterways
Affected waterways have been found to spread JD.
Potential sources of manure or effluent, including cross-boundary waterways, identified and treated to minimise risk of spreading infection.
✅ Risk Controlled
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4.3 Feed Management

Poor feed storage encourages pests and diseases which may contaminate feed or reduce its usefulness. Old feed can harbour disease organisms and pests that may be harmful to your livestock. Wet and mouldy feed is a potential source of disease or poisoning. For example, the organisms in mouldy hay or silage can cause abortion and Listeriosis. Spilled grain around grain storage areas can attract insect pests and vermin. Silos need to be gas tight to ensure fumigation treatments are effective and to prevent insects becoming resistant to treatments such as phosphine. There is a high risk that the first grain to pass through harvesters at the start of the season contains storage pests.
Risk Name
Actions
status
Notes
Files
1
Feed Storage
Keep feed in a clean, dry storage area.
Keep feed stores covered to prevent feed from becoming wet and mouldy.
Regularly inspect feed supplies to ensure they remain secured and fit for purpose.
Clean feed troughs regularly to avoid faecal contamination,
Dispose of old or contaminated feed safely, keeping it away from livestock and securing it from pests and diseases.
Clean any feed spills promptly to prevent spread around the property by wind or other means (vehicle wheels, clothing etc.)
✅ Risk Controlled
No results from filter

4.4 Fencing

Damaged fences can allow livestock to stray. It could also allow your neighbour’s livestock to mix with your stock.
Risk Name
Actions
status
Notes
Files
1
Fencing standards
Ensure fences prevent livestock from straying onto/off your property.⁠
Monitor fences regularly an ensure maintenance is completed as it is required.
✅ Risk Controlled
2
Fencing Inspection
The fence of every paddock should be checked as a routine before stock enter the paddock.
✅ Risk Controlled
3
Stray Animals
If animals stray off the property, they must be quarantined from other stock until a risk assessment can be made for the likelihood of Johne's Disease infection.
If stock < 12 months old stray onto an area of higher Johne's Disease risk than this property the will be sold before they calve down or become 2 years old.
If stock > 12 months stray onto an area of higher JD risk, they will be cleaned of faecal material on their feet/legs and quarantined from any young stock for 30 days.⁠
If stock stray onto the property, they will be be quarantined until a risk assessment will be made in conjunction with our veterinarian and managed appropriately.
This may include implications for stock that have come into contact with the stray animal(s).
✅ Risk Controlled
No results from filter

4.5 AgVet Chemicals

Chemical residues on plants and animal products can result in rejection from international and domestic markets, and can pose a risk to human health. The misuse of chemicals can also lead to the development of resistance by pests, potentially creating new biosecurity risks and management challenges. Inappropriate use of chemicals can cause insects to become resistant, making control difficult. This can cause more widespread and ongoing biosecurity problems.
Risk Name
Actions
status
Notes
Files
1
Label Directions
Be sure to follow the instructions on the label and observe withholding periods after treatments.⁠
Ensure only appropriately trained staff have access to AgVet chemicals.
Ensure use of chemicals is recorded appropriately.
✅ Risk Controlled
2
Development of resistance
If AgVet chemicals do not appear to be working as expected, this should be reported:⁠
in the case of veterinary chgemicals, to the farm vet⁠
in the case of insecticides, to the Department or local agronomist.
✅ Risk Controlled
No results from filter

4.6 Monitoring and Surveillance

Early detection of pests and diseases gives you the best chance of preventing pests or diseases from establishing on your property and ongoing additional expenses for their control. Early detection also increases the chances of eradicating a new pest or disease. Recording the absence of pests or diseases
Risk Name
Actions
status
Notes
Files
1
Monitoring
If AgVet chemicals do not appear to be working as expected, this should be reported:⁠
in the case of veterinary chgemicals, to the farm vet⁠
in the case of insecticides, to the Department or local agronomist.
✅ Risk Controlled
2
Investigate/Notify suspect Johne's Disease cases
Any suspect clinical cases investigated and notified to CVO, in accordance with state legislation.
High risk animals will be identified and prioritised for culling in conjunction with our veterinarian.
✅ Risk Controlled
No results from filter

4.7 Spread of disease within the herd

Vaccination can help transmission of disease within the herd. Choose appropriate vaccination strategies in consultation with your vet based on local knowledge and risk.
Risk Name
Actions
status
Notes
Files
1
Disease prevention - general
Consult with your Australian Cattle Vet regarding appropriate vaccinations for your herd. ⁠
All stock should be vaccinated against Clostridial diseases and Leptopspirosis.
Review best practice management for livestock health and welfare and review updates as they arise.
✅ Risk Controlled
2
Manage JD risk from other cattle or species
Don’t graze young animals in high-risk areas (e.g. adjacent to high-risk neighbours, with infected sheep, on land grazed by clinical or suspect cases).⁠
Minimise cattle, particularly calves, co-grazing with sheep.
✅ Risk Controlled
No results from filter

4.8 Spread of disease to and from humans

Some organisms can affect both humans and animals. Ensure you have appropriate risk assessment and measures in place to prevent human-animal transfer of disease.
Risk Name
Actions
status
Notes
Files
1
Q Fever and Tetanus
Ensure all personnel working on-farm are vaccinated for identified risk diseases including Q Fever and Tetanus.
✅ Risk Controlled
2
Leptospirosis
Ensure cattle are approproately vaccinated against Leptospirosis.
Consult your vet for a planned vaccination program.
✅ Risk Controlled
3
Hendravirus
Ensure any horses on the property are approriately identified and vaccinated against Hendravirus.⁠
Ensure all staff are aware of the signs of Hendravirus and the actions required if the disease is suspected.
⚠️ Risk Partially Controlled
No results from filter

5.0 Ferals and Weeds

5.1 Wild and Feral Animals

Wild or feral animals and vermin may carry disease causing organisms.
Risk Name
Actions
status
Notes
Files
1
Wild/Feral Animal Plan
Develop a wild and feral animal control program to protect livestock and cropping land.⁠
Particular biosecurity risks include:⁠
Dogs - Abortion from Neospora caninum⁠
Vermin and bird species - Salmonellosis
✅ Risk Controlled
2
Feed and Water contamination
Ensure farm buildings are in good repair and that feed and water sources are free from contamination.
✅ Risk Controlled
3
Local Area Control
Work with neighbours and other producers in your local area to implement a coordinated approach to feral animal control.
✅ Risk Controlled
4
Boundary Fences
Ensure Boundary Fences are appropriate to deal with local risks and that they are well maintained and insected regularly
✅ Risk Controlled
No results from filter

5.2 Weeds

Weed species are significant biosecurity problems in their own right, as well as being alternative hosts of some agricultural and horticultural pests. Some weeds can also make livestock sick. Grain export markets have zero tolerance for weed seeds, and may cause shipments to be rejected. Volunteer plants that have escaped from production areas and created a ‘green bridge’ can harbour pests or diseases between growing seasons.
Risk Name
Actions
status
Notes
Files
1
Weed Management Plan
Establish a weed management plan for the property, including plans for eradicating, containing or managing current weeds, and preventing the introduction of new species.
✅ Risk Controlled
2
High risk areas
Regularly check for and control weeds along dirt tracks and roads, in areas used to isolate new stock, and next to vehicle parking or cleaning areas.
✅ Risk Controlled
3
High Risk Times
Control weeds in fields and paddocks after flooding, drought or fire.⁠
Inspect any areas that have been recently landscaped (eg new roads or dams) or affected by land destruction (eg fences) and treat weeds before they have a chance to set seed and become established.
✅ Risk Controlled
No results from filter

5.3 Property cleanliness

Spilled food, rubbish dumps and carcases can attract pests or wild animals that carry diseases onto the property
Risk Name
Actions
status
Notes
Files
1
Remove attractants
Remove or contain anything that is likely to attract vermin, insect pests or wild animals.
✅ Risk Controlled
No results from filter

6.0 Train, Plan and Record

Ensure that staff are well trained and that you have the ability to trace where animals or plants have come from and where they went. Keep accurate records of purchases, sales and movement of all products entering or leaving the property

6.1 Biosecurity planning

Risk Name
Actions
status
Files
Notes
1
Review this biosecurity plan every 12 months
This plan should be reviewed every 12 months.
Undertake regular property inspections for actual or potential biosecurity issues.
✅ Risk Controlled
2
Visibility of plan
Ensure that this plan is readily available to all staff and contractors
✅ Risk Controlled
No results from filter

6.2 Record Keeping

A property owner or manager should to be able to ‘trace back’ and ‘trace forward’ if there is a disease, pest or weed incursion on their property
Risk Name
Actions
status
Files
Notes
1
Trace Back and Trace Forward
Keep records of purchases and sales, health certificates and declarations, and pest and disease monitoring activities
✅ Risk Controlled
2
Treatment records
Record livestock treatments accurately.
✅ Risk Controlled
3
Training Records
Record all Training date, employee and outcome
✅ Risk Controlled
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6.3 Staff Training

Anyone working on the property (including friends and family) may not know how easily diseases, pests and weeds can spread and how to prevent this from happening.
Risk Name
Actions
status
Files
Notes
1
Training
Inform staff of the biosecurity standards required on site.
Provide biosecurity training or information sessions for staff
✅ Risk Controlled
No results from filter

6.4 Suspect Diseases, Plants and Weeds

You have a responsibility to report unusual diseases, pests or weeds to an agronomist, vet, state DPI, the Emergency Animal Disease Watch Hotline or the Exotic Plant Pest Hotline.
Risk Name
Actions
status
Files
Notes
1
Reporting
Know who to call if your suspect you have an emergency animal disease or plant pest.
Keep details of state DPIs, vets, agronomists.
Emergency Animal Disease Watch Hotline 1800 675888
Exotic Plant Pest Hotline 1800 084881
✅ Risk Controlled
No results from filter

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