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1
Open Article
[EXAMPLE ITEM] Doing good by drinking wine? Ethical value networks and upscaling of wine production in Australia, New Zealand and South Africa
Overton, J; Murray, WE; Howson, K
There has been a rise in recent decades of consumer campaigns to promote more ethically responsible food and consumer goods production. These campaigns have spanned movements such as fair trade, food miles and organics. They have evoked significant if uneven response from producers and some government agencies. These responses, seen in changes to production methods, ownership structures, distribution systems and marketing have involved new ways of thinking and operating and can be regarded as interesting forms of Responsible Research and Innovation (RRI). Adopting combined sectoral and locality case study perspectives, this paper examines the example of the wine industry in a number of production locations (South Africa, Australia and New Zealand) and analyses how ethically responsible values of justice (fair trade), sustainability (organic production) and provenance (Geographical Indications) have been translated into forms of industrial innovation embodied and perpetuated through and in 'ethical value networks'.
02-Dec
EUROPEAN PLANNING STUDIES
10.1080/09654313.2019.1628181
[example item] doing good by drinking wine? ethical value networks and upscaling of wine production in australia, new zealand and south africathere has been a rise in recent decades of consumer campaigns to promote more ethically responsible food and consumer goods production. these campaigns have spanned movements such as fair trade, food miles and organics. they have evoked significant if uneven response from producers and some government agencies. these responses, seen in changes to production methods, ownership structures, distribution systems and marketing have involved new ways of thinking and operating and can be regarded as interesting forms of responsible research and innovation (rri). adopting combined sectoral and locality case study perspectives, this paper examines the example of the wine industry in a number of production locations (south africa, australia and new zealand) and analyses how ethically responsible values of justice (fair trade), sustainability (organic production) and provenance (geographical indications) have been translated into forms of industrial innovation embodied and perpetuated through and in 'ethical value networks'.
13
2/12/2022, 5:38 PM
2
Open Article
[EXAMPLE ITEM] Innovation in the Canadian Wine Industry: Evidence from Three Wine-Producing Regions
Doloreux, D; Lord-Tarte, E
The aim of this article is to investigate if and how different regional conditions influence innovation patterns in the Canadian wine industry. The empirical analysis draws from an original survey at the firm level and compares the regions of Ontario, British Columbia and Quebec. The results show that, contrary to expectations, firms innovate very similarly in the three wine-producing regions in spite of substantial historical and territorial differences. Therefore, distinct regional characteristics do not lead to variations in innovation in the Canadian wine industry.
04-May
EUROPEAN PLANNING STUDIES
10.1080/09654313.2012.758689
Canada
Wine
[example item] innovation in the canadian wine industry: evidence from three wine-producing regionsthe aim of this article is to investigate if and how different regional conditions influence innovation patterns in the canadian wine industry. the empirical analysis draws from an original survey at the firm level and compares the regions of ontario, british columbia and quebec. the results show that, contrary to expectations, firms innovate very similarly in the three wine-producing regions in spite of substantial historical and territorial differences. therefore, distinct regional characteristics do not lead to variations in innovation in the canadian wine industry.canadawine
18
2/12/2022, 5:38 PM
3
Open Article
[EXAMPLE ITEM] An automated pipeline for the discovery of conspiracy and conspiracy theory narrative frameworks: Bridgegate, Pizzagate and storytelling on the web
TangherliniI, TR; Shahsavari, S; ShahbaziI, B; Ebrahimzadeh, E; Roychowdhury, V
Although a great deal of attention has been paid to how conspiracy theories circulate on social media, and the deleterious effect that they, and their factual counterpart conspiracies, have on political institutions, there has been little computational work done on describing their narrative structures. Predicating our work on narrative theory, we present an automated pipeline for the discovery and description of the generative narrative frameworks of conspiracy theories that circulate on social media, and actual conspiracies reported in the news media. We base this work on two separate comprehensive repositories of blog posts and news articles describing the well-known conspiracy theory Pizzagate from 2016, and the New Jersey political conspiracy Bridgegate from 2013. Inspired by the qualitative narrative theory of Greimas, we formulate a graphical generative machine learning model where nodes represent actors/actants, and multi-edges and self-loops among nodes capture context-specific relationships. Posts and news items are viewed as samples of subgraphs of the hidden narrative framework network. The problem of reconstructing the underlying narrative structure is then posed as a latent model estimation problem. To derive the narrative frameworks in our target corpora, we automatically extract and aggregate the actants (people, places, objects) and their relationships from the posts and articles. We capture context specific actants and interactant relationships by developing a system of supernodes and subnodes. We use these to construct an actant-relationship network, which constitutes the underlying generative narrative framework for each of the corpora. We show how the Pizzagate framework relies on the conspiracy theorists’ interpretation of “hidden knowledge” to link otherwise unlinked domains of human interaction, and hypothesize that this multi-domain focus is an important feature of conspiracy theories. We contrast this to the single domain focus of an actual conspiracy. While Pizzagate relies on the alignment of multiple domains, Bridgegate remains firmly rooted in the single domain of New Jersey politics. We hypothesize that the narrative framework of a conspiracy theory might stabilize quickly in contrast to the narrative framework of an actual conspiracy, which might develop more slowly as revelations come to light. By highlighting the structural differences between the two narrative frameworks, our approach could be used by private and public analysts to help distinguish between conspiracy theories and conspiracies.
2020
PLoS ONE
10.137 1/journal.pone.0233879
Tangherlini et al. 2020 - An automated pipeline for the discovery of con ... rative frameworks - Bridgegate, Pizzagate and storytelling on the web.pdf
Conspiracy Theories
Reddit
Corpus Linguistics
To Read
Several characteristics of the narrative framework differed between the Bridgegate conspiracy and Pizzagate conspiracy theory.
Test 2
[example item] an automated pipeline for the discovery of conspiracy and conspiracy theory narrative frameworks: bridgegate, pizzagate and storytelling on the webalthough a great deal of attention has been paid to how conspiracy theories circulate on social media, and the deleterious effect that they, and their factual counterpart conspiracies, have on political institutions, there has been little computational work done on describing their narrative structures. predicating our work on narrative theory, we present an automated pipeline for the discovery and description of the generative narrative frameworks of conspiracy theories that circulate on social media, and actual conspiracies reported in the news media. we base this work on two separate comprehensive repositories of blog posts and news articles describing the well-known conspiracy theory pizzagate from 2016, and the new jersey political conspiracy bridgegate from 2013. inspired by the qualitative narrative theory of greimas, we formulate a graphical generative machine learning model where nodes represent actors/actants, and multi-edges and self-loops among nodes capture context-specific relationships. posts and news items are viewed as samples of subgraphs of the hidden narrative framework network. the problem of reconstructing the underlying narrative structure is then posed as a latent model estimation problem. to derive the narrative frameworks in our target corpora, we automatically extract and aggregate the actants (people, places, objects) and their relationships from the posts and articles. we capture context specific actants and interactant relationships by developing a system of supernodes and subnodes. we use these to construct an actant-relationship network, which constitutes the underlying generative narrative framework for each of the corpora. we show how the pizzagate framework relies on the conspiracy theorists’ interpretation of “hidden knowledge” to link otherwise unlinked domains of human interaction, and hypothesize that this multi-domain focus is an important feature of conspiracy theories. we contrast this to the single domain focus of an actual conspiracy. while pizzagate relies on the alignment of multiple domains, bridgegate remains firmly rooted in the single domain of new jersey politics. we hypothesize that the narrative framework of a conspiracy theory might stabilize quickly in contrast to the narrative framework of an actual conspiracy, which might develop more slowly as revelations come to light. by highlighting the structural differences between the two narrative frameworks, our approach could be used by private and public analysts to help distinguish between conspiracy theories and conspiracies.conspiracy theoriesredditseveral characteristics of the narrative framework differed between the bridgegate conspiracy and pizzagate conspiracy theory.test 2
131
Journal Article
6/3/2022, 11:09 AM
4
Open Article
[EXAMPLE ITEM] Why do scientists lie?
Bright LK
It's natural to think of scientists as truth seekers, people driven by an intense curiosity to understand the natural world. Yet this picture of scientists and scientific inquiry sits uncomfortably with the reality and prevalence of scientific fraud. If one wants to get at the truth about nature, why lie? Won't that just set inquiry back, as people pursue false leads? To understand why this occurs – and what can be done about it – we need to understand the social structures scientists work within, and how some of the institutions which enable science to be such a successful endeavour all things considered, also abet and encourage fraud.
2021
Royal Institute of Philosophy supplement
10.1017/s1358246121000102
[example item] why do scientists lie?it's natural to think of scientists as truth seekers, people driven by an intense curiosity to understand the natural world. yet this picture of scientists and scientific inquiry sits uncomfortably with the reality and prevalence of scientific fraud. if one wants to get at the truth about nature, why lie? won't that just set inquiry back, as people pursue false leads? to understand why this occurs – and what can be done about it – we need to understand the social structures scientists work within, and how some of the institutions which enable science to be such a successful endeavour all things considered, also abet and encourage fraud.
132
Journal Article
6/6/2022, 12:44 PM
5
Open Article
[EXAMPLE ITEM] The entropic brain: a theory of conscious states informed by neuroimaging research with psychedelic drugs
Carhart-Harris RL,Leech R,Hellyer PJ,Shanahan M,Feilding A,Tagliazucchi E,Chialvo DR,Nutt D
Entropy is a dimensionless quantity that is used for measuring uncertainty about the state of a system but it can also imply physical qualities, where high entropy is synonymous with high disorder. Entropy is applied here in the context of states of consciousness and their associated neurodynamics, with a particular focus on the psychedelic state. The psychedelic state is considered an exemplar of a primitive or primary state of consciousness that preceded the development of modern, adult, human, normal waking consciousness. Based on neuroimaging data with psilocybin, a classic psychedelic drug, it is argued that the defining feature of "primary states" is elevated entropy in certain aspects of brain function, such as the repertoire of functional connectivity motifs that form and fragment across time. Indeed, since there is a greater repertoire of connectivity motifs in the psychedelic state than in normal waking consciousness, this implies that primary states may exhibit "criticality," i.e., the property of being poised at a "critical" point in a transition zone between order and disorder where certain phenomena such as power-law scaling appear. Moreover, if primary states are critical, then this suggests that entropy is suppressed in normal waking consciousness, meaning that the brain operates just below criticality. It is argued that this entropy suppression furnishes normal waking consciousness with a constrained quality and associated metacognitive functions, including reality-testing and self-awareness. It is also proposed that entry into primary states depends on a collapse of the normally highly organized activity within the default-mode network (DMN) and a decoupling between the DMN and the medial temporal lobes (which are normally significantly coupled). These hypotheses can be tested by examining brain activity and associated cognition in other candidate primary states such as rapid eye movement (REM) sleep and early psychosis and comparing these with non-primary states such as normal waking consciousness and the anaesthetized state.
2014
Frontiers in human neuroscience
10.3389/fnhum.2014.00020
[example item] the entropic brain: a theory of conscious states informed by neuroimaging research with psychedelic drugsentropy is a dimensionless quantity that is used for measuring uncertainty about the state of a system but it can also imply physical qualities, where high entropy is synonymous with high disorder. entropy is applied here in the context of states of consciousness and their associated neurodynamics, with a particular focus on the psychedelic state. the psychedelic state is considered an exemplar of a primitive or primary state of consciousness that preceded the development of modern, adult, human, normal waking consciousness. based on neuroimaging data with psilocybin, a classic psychedelic drug, it is argued that the defining feature of "primary states" is elevated entropy in certain aspects of brain function, such as the repertoire of functional connectivity motifs that form and fragment across time. indeed, since there is a greater repertoire of connectivity motifs in the psychedelic state than in normal waking consciousness, this implies that primary states may exhibit "criticality," i.e., the property of being poised at a "critical" point in a transition zone between order and disorder where certain phenomena such as power-law scaling appear. moreover, if primary states are critical, then this suggests that entropy is suppressed in normal waking consciousness, meaning that the brain operates just below criticality. it is argued that this entropy suppression furnishes normal waking consciousness with a constrained quality and associated metacognitive functions, including reality-testing and self-awareness. it is also proposed that entry into primary states depends on a collapse of the normally highly organized activity within the default-mode network (dmn) and a decoupling between the dmn and the medial temporal lobes (which are normally significantly coupled). these hypotheses can be tested by examining brain activity and associated cognition in other candidate primary states such as rapid eye movement (rem) sleep and early psychosis and comparing these with non-primary states such as normal waking consciousness and the anaesthetized state.
133
Journal Article
6/6/2022, 12:44 PM
6
Open Article
[EXAMPLE ITEM] The science of visual data communication: What works
Franconeri SL,Padilla LM,Shah P,Zacks JM,Hullman J
Effectively designed data visualizations allow viewers to use their powerful visual systems to understand patterns in data across science, education, health, and public policy. But ineffectively designed visualizations can cause confusion, misunderstanding, or even distrust-especially among viewers with low graphical literacy. We review research-backed guidelines for creating effective and intuitive visualizations oriented toward communicating data to students, coworkers, and the general public. We describe how the visual system can quickly extract broad statistics from a display, whereas poorly designed displays can lead to misperceptions and illusions. Extracting global statistics is fast, but comparing between subsets of values is slow. Effective graphics avoid taxing working memory, guide attention, and respect familiar conventions. Data visualizations can play a critical role in teaching and communication, provided that designers tailor those visualizations to their audience.
2021
Psychological science in the public interest: a journal of the American Psychological Society
10.1177/15291006211051956
[example item] the science of visual data communication: what workseffectively designed data visualizations allow viewers to use their powerful visual systems to understand patterns in data across science, education, health, and public policy. but ineffectively designed visualizations can cause confusion, misunderstanding, or even distrust-especially among viewers with low graphical literacy. we review research-backed guidelines for creating effective and intuitive visualizations oriented toward communicating data to students, coworkers, and the general public. we describe how the visual system can quickly extract broad statistics from a display, whereas poorly designed displays can lead to misperceptions and illusions. extracting global statistics is fast, but comparing between subsets of values is slow. effective graphics avoid taxing working memory, guide attention, and respect familiar conventions. data visualizations can play a critical role in teaching and communication, provided that designers tailor those visualizations to their audience.
134
Review
6/6/2022, 12:44 PM
7
Open Article
[EXAMPLE ITEM] Search where you will find most: Comparing the disciplinary coverage of 56 bibliographic databases
Gusenbauer M
This paper introduces a novel scientometrics method and applies it to estimate the subject coverages of many of the popular English-focused bibliographic databases in academia. The method uses query results as a common denominator to compare a wide variety of search engines, repositories, digital libraries, and other bibliographic databases. The method extends existing sampling-based approaches that analyze smaller sets of database coverages. The findings show the relative and absolute subject coverages of 56 databases-information that has often not been available before. Knowing the databases' absolute subject coverage allows the selection of the most comprehensive databases for searches requiring high recall/sensitivity, particularly relevant in lookup or exploratory searches. Knowing the databases' relative subject coverage allows the selection of specialized databases for searches requiring high precision/specificity, particularly relevant in systematic searches. The findings illustrate not only differences in the disciplinary coverage of Google Scholar, Scopus, or Web of Science, but also of less frequently analyzed databases. For example, researchers might be surprised how Meta (discontinued), Embase, or Europe PMC are found to cover more records than PubMed in Medicine and other health subjects. These findings should encourage researchers to re-evaluate their go-to databases, also against newly introduced options. Searching with more comprehensive databases can improve finding, particularly when selecting the most fitting databases needs particular thought, such as in systematic reviews and meta-analyses. This comparison can also help librarians and other information experts re-evaluate expensive database procurement strategies. Researchers without institutional access learn which open databases are likely most comprehensive in their disciplines.
2022
Scientometrics
10.1007/s11192-022-04289-7
[example item] search where you will find most: comparing the disciplinary coverage of 56 bibliographic databasesthis paper introduces a novel scientometrics method and applies it to estimate the subject coverages of many of the popular english-focused bibliographic databases in academia. the method uses query results as a common denominator to compare a wide variety of search engines, repositories, digital libraries, and other bibliographic databases. the method extends existing sampling-based approaches that analyze smaller sets of database coverages. the findings show the relative and absolute subject coverages of 56 databases-information that has often not been available before. knowing the databases' absolute subject coverage allows the selection of the most comprehensive databases for searches requiring high recall/sensitivity, particularly relevant in lookup or exploratory searches. knowing the databases' relative subject coverage allows the selection of specialized databases for searches requiring high precision/specificity, particularly relevant in systematic searches. the findings illustrate not only differences in the disciplinary coverage of google scholar, scopus, or web of science, but also of less frequently analyzed databases. for example, researchers might be surprised how meta (discontinued), embase, or europe pmc are found to cover more records than pubmed in medicine and other health subjects. these findings should encourage researchers to re-evaluate their go-to databases, also against newly introduced options. searching with more comprehensive databases can improve finding, particularly when selecting the most fitting databases needs particular thought, such as in systematic reviews and meta-analyses. this comparison can also help librarians and other information experts re-evaluate expensive database procurement strategies. researchers without institutional access learn which open databases are likely most comprehensive in their disciplines.
135
Journal Article
6/6/2022, 12:44 PM
8
Open Article
[EXAMPLE ITEM] What is entrepreneurial failure? Implications for future research
Jenkins A,McKelvie A
Research into entrepreneurial failure is increasing in prevalence. However, there remains a lack of clarity surrounding how failure is conceptualized. This is an important issue because how failure is conceptualized influences the relevance of research questions posed and the comparability of findings across studies. In this article, we review conceptualizations of entrepreneurial failure including at two levels of analysis (firm and individual) and perspectives of failure (objective and subjective). We discuss the implications these conceptualizations have for future research, including the sampling frame and questions scholars ask.
2016
International small business journal
10.1177/0266242615574011
[example item] what is entrepreneurial failure? implications for future researchresearch into entrepreneurial failure is increasing in prevalence. however, there remains a lack of clarity surrounding how failure is conceptualized. this is an important issue because how failure is conceptualized influences the relevance of research questions posed and the comparability of findings across studies. in this article, we review conceptualizations of entrepreneurial failure including at two levels of analysis (firm and individual) and perspectives of failure (objective and subjective). we discuss the implications these conceptualizations have for future research, including the sampling frame and questions scholars ask.
137
Journal Article
6/6/2022, 12:44 PM
9
Open Article
[EXAMPLE ITEM] Why contagious yawning does not (yet) equate to empathy
Massen JJM,Gallup AC
Various studies and researchers have proposed a link between contagious yawning and empathy, yet the conceptual basis for the proposed connection is not clear and deserves critical evaluation. Therefore, we systematically examined the available empirical evidence addressing this association; i.e., a critical review of studies on inter-individual differences in contagion and self-reported values of empathy, differences in contagion based on familiarity or sex, and differences in contagion among individuals with psychological disorders, as well as developmental research, and brain imaging and neurophysiological studies. In doing so, we reveal a pattern of inconsistent and inconclusive evidence regarding the connection between contagious yawning and empathy. Furthermore, we identify study limitations and confounding variables, such as visual attention and social inhibition. Future research examining links between contagious yawning and empathy requires more rigorous investigation involving objective measurements to explicitly test for this connection.
2017
Neuroscience and biobehavioral reviews
10.1016/j.neubiorev.2017.07.006
[example item] why contagious yawning does not (yet) equate to empathyvarious studies and researchers have proposed a link between contagious yawning and empathy, yet the conceptual basis for the proposed connection is not clear and deserves critical evaluation. therefore, we systematically examined the available empirical evidence addressing this association; i.e., a critical review of studies on inter-individual differences in contagion and self-reported values of empathy, differences in contagion based on familiarity or sex, and differences in contagion among individuals with psychological disorders, as well as developmental research, and brain imaging and neurophysiological studies. in doing so, we reveal a pattern of inconsistent and inconclusive evidence regarding the connection between contagious yawning and empathy. furthermore, we identify study limitations and confounding variables, such as visual attention and social inhibition. future research examining links between contagious yawning and empathy requires more rigorous investigation involving objective measurements to explicitly test for this connection.
138
Review
6/6/2022, 12:44 PM
10
Open Article
[EXAMPLE ITEM] A bibliometric review of the first thirty years of the Journal of Environmental Psychology
Milfont TL,Page E
The Journal of Environmental Psychology (JEP) celebrated its 30th anniversary in 2011, and since its foundation the journal has given voice to a growing international and interdisplinary community of researchers interested in person-environment interactions. To celebrate, this paper provides a bibliometric review of full-length articles published since its foundation, presenting “Top 10 Lists” including the most prolific authors, countries and universities. To obtain citation records and bibliometric indices, the ScienceDirect page of the Journal, Web of Science and the Publish or Perish software were used. A total of 858 articles published during 1981–2011 were included in the final analysis. Highlights from the review include: the United States of America is the country with the most publications in JEP, but international submission is large with submissions from 42 different countries in 2011; the three most prevalent themes for articles are Pro-environmental Attitudes and Behavior, Spatial Cognition, and Place Attachment or Identity; and the impact factor of the Journal has increased steadily. Although bibliometric indices do no fully capture the multidimensional complexities of scientific impact of a journal, this review provides strong evidence that JEP has been a story of success. The wider environmental psychology community should be proud of the Journal's accomplishments.
2013
Psyecology
10.1080/21711976.2013.10773866
[example item] a bibliometric review of the first thirty years of the journal of environmental psychologythe journal of environmental psychology (jep) celebrated its 30th anniversary in 2011, and since its foundation the journal has given voice to a growing international and interdisplinary community of researchers interested in person-environment interactions. to celebrate, this paper provides a bibliometric review of full-length articles published since its foundation, presenting “top 10 lists” including the most prolific authors, countries and universities. to obtain citation records and bibliometric indices, the sciencedirect page of the journal, web of science and the publish or perish software were used. a total of 858 articles published during 1981–2011 were included in the final analysis. highlights from the review include: the united states of america is the country with the most publications in jep, but international submission is large with submissions from 42 different countries in 2011; the three most prevalent themes for articles are pro-environmental attitudes and behavior, spatial cognition, and place attachment or identity; and the impact factor of the journal has increased steadily. although bibliometric indices do no fully capture the multidimensional complexities of scientific impact of a journal, this review provides strong evidence that jep has been a story of success. the wider environmental psychology community should be proud of the journal's accomplishments.
139
Journal Article
6/6/2022, 12:44 PM
11
Open Article
[EXAMPLE ITEM] Longing for landscape: Homesickness and place attachment among rural out-migrants in the 19th and 21st centuries
Morse C,Mudgett J
Migration research has begun to consider the emotions associated with moving. In so doing, it has engaged with geographies of home and feelings of homesickness, yet less so with emotional attachment to elements of the non-human environment. Historians, too, have begun to consider the human longing for natural landscapes, though historical examinations of homesickness tend to be similarly focused on longing for family and familiar built environments. This mixed methods research, conducted by a geographer and a historian, considers the environmental homesickness experienced by rural out-migrants. Out-migrated Vermonters have consistently expressed a longing for landscape from the nineteenth century to the present. Drawing on nineteenth-century archival materials and findings from a recent migration survey, the paper examines the production of place-based identities and enduring attachments to landscape over time. The research reveals the emotional dimensions of moving away and the ways in which people have attempted to remain connected to home. The work suggests expanding theorizations of home to include the natural environment. The intersection of individual identity, rural place attachment, and migration history is fertile ground for additional research.
2017
Journal of rural studies
10.1016/j.jrurstud.2017.01.002
[example item] longing for landscape: homesickness and place attachment among rural out-migrants in the 19th and 21st centuriesmigration research has begun to consider the emotions associated with moving. in so doing, it has engaged with geographies of home and feelings of homesickness, yet less so with emotional attachment to elements of the non-human environment. historians, too, have begun to consider the human longing for natural landscapes, though historical examinations of homesickness tend to be similarly focused on longing for family and familiar built environments. this mixed methods research, conducted by a geographer and a historian, considers the environmental homesickness experienced by rural out-migrants. out-migrated vermonters have consistently expressed a longing for landscape from the nineteenth century to the present. drawing on nineteenth-century archival materials and findings from a recent migration survey, the paper examines the production of place-based identities and enduring attachments to landscape over time. the research reveals the emotional dimensions of moving away and the ways in which people have attempted to remain connected to home. the work suggests expanding theorizations of home to include the natural environment. the intersection of individual identity, rural place attachment, and migration history is fertile ground for additional research.
140
Journal Article
6/6/2022, 12:44 PM
12
Open Article
[EXAMPLE ITEM] Who are the ‘don’t knows’? Missing data in surveys of post-soviet conflict-affected regions
Naylor F,O'Loughlin J
2020
Europe-Asia studies
10.1080/09668136.2020.1808192
[example item] who are the ‘don’t knows’? missing data in surveys of post-soviet conflict-affected regions
141
Journal Article
6/6/2022, 12:44 PM
13
Open Article
[EXAMPLE ITEM] Defining place attachment: A tripartite organizing framework
Scannell L,Gifford R
Place attachment has been researched quite broadly, and so has been defined in a variety of ways. The various definitions of the concept are reviewed and synthesized into a three-dimensional, person–process–place organizing framework. The person dimension of place attachment refers to its individually or collectively determined meanings. The psychological dimension includes the affective, cognitive, and behavioral components of attachment. The place dimension emphasizes the place characteristics of attachment, including spatial level, specificity, and the prominence of social or physical elements. In addition, potential functions of place attachment are reviewed. The framework organizes related place attachment concepts and thus clarifies the term. The framework may also be used to stimulate new research, investigate multidimensionality, create operational definitions for quantitative studies, guide semi-structured interviews for qualitative studies, and assist in conflict resolution for successful land-use management.
2010
Journal of environmental psychology
10.1016/j.jenvp.2009.09.006
[example item] defining place attachment: a tripartite organizing frameworkplace attachment has been researched quite broadly, and so has been defined in a variety of ways. the various definitions of the concept are reviewed and synthesized into a three-dimensional, person–process–place organizing framework. the person dimension of place attachment refers to its individually or collectively determined meanings. the psychological dimension includes the affective, cognitive, and behavioral components of attachment. the place dimension emphasizes the place characteristics of attachment, including spatial level, specificity, and the prominence of social or physical elements. in addition, potential functions of place attachment are reviewed. the framework organizes related place attachment concepts and thus clarifies the term. the framework may also be used to stimulate new research, investigate multidimensionality, create operational definitions for quantitative studies, guide semi-structured interviews for qualitative studies, and assist in conflict resolution for successful land-use management.
142
Journal Article
6/6/2022, 12:44 PM
14
Open Article
[EXAMPLE ITEM] Teaching and learning guide for: Guidelines for respecting gender diversity in psychological research
Stinson DA,Cameron JJ
2020
Social and personality psychology compass
10.1111/spc3.12535
[example item] teaching and learning guide for: guidelines for respecting gender diversity in psychological research
143
Journal Article
6/6/2022, 12:44 PM
15
Open Article
[EXAMPLE ITEM] Tattoos and unfavorable treatment among employees in the hospitality industry
Tews MJ,Stafford K
Purpose As employers are purportedly becoming more receptive to tattoos, the question arises whether tattooed employees are nonetheless subject to unfavorable treatment. In this light, the purpose of this paper is to examine the impact of different tattoo characteristics on four outcomes: annual earnings, fair interpersonal treatment from supervisors, perceived discrimination and perceived overqualification. The specific tattoo characteristics were tattoo number, visibility and content. Design/methodology/approach Survey data from a sample of 162 tattooed hospitality employees were obtained from a Qualtrics research panel and analyzed using regression. Findings The results demonstrated that employees with a greater degree of dark tattoo content (content of a more threatening and intimidating nature) received less favorable treatment, as demonstrated by significant relationships with fair interpersonal treatment, perceived discrimination and perceived overqualification. Tattoo number was related to increased perceived discrimination and perceived overqualification. At the same time, tattoo number was related to increased annual earnings, signaling a benefit. Research limitations/implications Measures of tattoo characteristics and workplace outcomes were collected in a single survey. An analysis of data collected at different points would potentially provide a more definitive test of cause and effect. Practical implications On one front, organizations should establish grooming policies that specify what is acceptable with respect to tattoos. To help minimize personality-related tattoo stereotypes from influencing hiring decisions, organizations could use personality assessments to make the hiring process more objective. Moreover, diversity training could address tattoo-related stereotypes, bias and prejudice. Originality/value Even though prior studies have demonstrated that tattooed people are viewed as less suitable for employment, research focused on the relationship between tattoos and actual discrimination has been limited. The results from this study highlight that employees with tattoos may still be subject to maltreatment, despite the mainstreaming of tattoos.
2020
International journal of contemporary hospitality management
10.1108/ijchm-08-2019-0712
[example item] tattoos and unfavorable treatment among employees in the hospitality industrypurpose as employers are purportedly becoming more receptive to tattoos, the question arises whether tattooed employees are nonetheless subject to unfavorable treatment. in this light, the purpose of this paper is to examine the impact of different tattoo characteristics on four outcomes: annual earnings, fair interpersonal treatment from supervisors, perceived discrimination and perceived overqualification. the specific tattoo characteristics were tattoo number, visibility and content. design/methodology/approach survey data from a sample of 162 tattooed hospitality employees were obtained from a qualtrics research panel and analyzed using regression. findings the results demonstrated that employees with a greater degree of dark tattoo content (content of a more threatening and intimidating nature) received less favorable treatment, as demonstrated by significant relationships with fair interpersonal treatment, perceived discrimination and perceived overqualification. tattoo number was related to increased perceived discrimination and perceived overqualification. at the same time, tattoo number was related to increased annual earnings, signaling a benefit. research limitations/implications measures of tattoo characteristics and workplace outcomes were collected in a single survey. an analysis of data collected at different points would potentially provide a more definitive test of cause and effect. practical implications on one front, organizations should establish grooming policies that specify what is acceptable with respect to tattoos. to help minimize personality-related tattoo stereotypes from influencing hiring decisions, organizations could use personality assessments to make the hiring process more objective. moreover, diversity training could address tattoo-related stereotypes, bias and prejudice. originality/value even though prior studies have demonstrated that tattooed people are viewed as less suitable for employment, research focused on the relationship between tattoos and actual discrimination has been limited. the results from this study highlight that employees with tattoos may still be subject to maltreatment, despite the mainstreaming of tattoos.
144
Journal Article
6/6/2022, 12:44 PM
16
Open Article
[EXAMPLE ITEM] Psychedelic-assisted group therapy: A systematic review
Trope A,Anderson BT,Hooker AR,Glick G,Stauffer C,Woolley JD
Contemporary research with classic psychedelic drugs (e.g., lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) and psilocybin) is indebted to the twentieth-century researchers and clinicians who generated valuable clinical knowledge of these substances through experimentation. Several recent reviews that highlight the contributions of this early literature have focused on psychedelic-assisted individual psychotherapy modalities. None have attempted to systematically identify and compile experimental studies of psychedelic-assisted group therapy. In therapeutic settings, psychedelics were often used to enhance group therapy for a variety of populations and clinical indications. We report on the results of a systematic review of the published literature in English and Spanish on psychedelic-assisted group therapies. Publications are characterized by their clinical approach, experimental method, and clinical outcomes. Given the renewed interest in the clinical use of psychedelic medicines, this review aims to stimulate hypotheses to be tested in future research on psychedelic-assisted psychotherapy, group process, and interpersonal functioning.
2019
Journal of psychoactive drugs
10.1080/02791072.2019.1593559
[example item] psychedelic-assisted group therapy: a systematic reviewcontemporary research with classic psychedelic drugs (e.g., lysergic acid diethylamide (lsd) and psilocybin) is indebted to the twentieth-century researchers and clinicians who generated valuable clinical knowledge of these substances through experimentation. several recent reviews that highlight the contributions of this early literature have focused on psychedelic-assisted individual psychotherapy modalities. none have attempted to systematically identify and compile experimental studies of psychedelic-assisted group therapy. in therapeutic settings, psychedelics were often used to enhance group therapy for a variety of populations and clinical indications. we report on the results of a systematic review of the published literature in english and spanish on psychedelic-assisted group therapies. publications are characterized by their clinical approach, experimental method, and clinical outcomes. given the renewed interest in the clinical use of psychedelic medicines, this review aims to stimulate hypotheses to be tested in future research on psychedelic-assisted psychotherapy, group process, and interpersonal functioning.
145
Journal Article
6/6/2022, 12:44 PM
17
Open Article
[EXAMPLE ITEM] Arachnophobic entomologists: When two more legs makes a big difference
Vetter RS
2013
American entomologist
10.1093/ae/59.3.168
[example item] arachnophobic entomologists: when two more legs makes a big difference
146
Journal Article
6/6/2022, 12:44 PM
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