Segment

Assigning personas to each user to paint a picture of our target customers.
The core principle here is to deliberately not serve all users. It is better to make a product that a small number of people love than to make a product that a large number of people somewhat like.

Defining personas by their primary motivation
What motivations lead customers to Ramblers Way? What are our customers seeking? Reading through every answer, some big themes get repeated:
An ethical supply chain based on U.S. labor and U.S. materials
Lower, better environmental impact
A love of wool
Comfort
Style, including a love of tradition, and other aesthetic considerations

Many, many respondents cited combinations of those motivations. To understand our customers in detail, I defined personas based on what I thought was the primary motivation expressed by each survey respondent. I did this by hand based on my own judgment, for better or worse. There are some limitations here. For instance, many people probably love wool because of its lower environment impact, but if they didn’t explicitly mention that, they got classified as “primarily fabric-conscious”. I also created a whole category for the “vocally price-sensitive”, and I gave priority to that label.

Our Six Personas
Persona
1
Primarily Supply-Chain-Conscious
2
Primarily Eco-Conscious
3
Primarily Fabric-Conscious
4
Primarily Aesthetics/Style-Conscious
5
Primarily Comfort-Conscious
6
Vocally Price-Sensitive
There are no rows in this table

Assigning personas
When searching for product:market fit, most people try to change the product. It is actually much more efficient to first try to change the market. By assigning personas, we can test different markets to efficiently find the customers who are already seeking us, but don’t yet know about us.

For our initial persona definitions, I segmented by the primary motivations outlined above. In the future, we can build this into more traditional demographic or psychographic profiles.

Assigning a persona to every survey response
6
Search
What about your Ramblers Way clothing gives you the most satisfaction?
Persona
1
That it looks and feels more elegant than some wool shirts.
Primarily Aesthetics/Style-Conscious
2
the wool used. It is very difficult to find wool clothing.
Primarily Fabric-Conscious
3
It’s USA made. USA wool.
Primarily Supply-Chain-Conscious
4
The all encompassing quality, style, fit, and versatility of your clothing is what I find most satisfying.
Primarily Supply-Chain-Conscious
5
thermal properties of wool; support american wool
Vocally Price-Sensitive
6
That it’s made of natural materials and with domestic materials and labor
Primarily Supply-Chain-Conscious
7
Made in the USA
Primarily Supply-Chain-Conscious
8
Comfort, good looks and warmth
Primarily Comfort-Conscious
9
quality
Primarily Fabric-Conscious
10
Knowing that the garments support the US textile industry.
Primarily Supply-Chain-Conscious
11
Knowing that it is organic and made in America
Primarily Comfort-Conscious
12
Softness, Quality, laundering, uniqueness
Primarily Fabric-Conscious
13
The fact that I can wear wool products made in the USA
Primarily Comfort-Conscious
14
The clothing is well made -- good value for the price.
Vocally Price-Sensitive
15
They are well made/long lasting. I love that they are made in the USA, from domestically sourced fibers. I enjoy the performance factor of merino. It is worth it to me to spend more on something that is long lasting and ethically sourced even though my income is not high enough to buy it all the time
Vocally Price-Sensitive
16
The natural feel and less laundry
Primarily Comfort-Conscious
17
Tactile and climate comfort. Domestic supply chain. Again I'm really talking about the merino line. I strive for, and most days hit, 100% wool for every layer. Before finding and buying any rambler's way, I was already satisfied by how much more comfortable merino is than cotton over the course of a day. What satisfies me about rambler's way's merino is that a) it's sheep-to-sewn here in the country I live in b) it is that bit more comfortable and durable than the competition. To expand on the fabric for a moment, the brands I had previously found kept introducing other fibers - particularly, for example, synthetics into underwear and tshirts. I don't object to genuine advancement; however, every single blend I've tried of wool with a synthetic made the wool worse. Less comfortable, less odor resistant, and somehow despite durability being the biggest cited reason for introducing a synthetic mix, less durable. If there's any blend with synthetic I don't even try it any more. Durability does indeed seem to be a big struggle for merino in general below a certain weight or for underwear, and my lightweight 100% merino items from patagonia and amazon all tended to disintegrate (icebreaker and wool&prince don't do lightweight 100% and even ibex whose quality I liked wasn't quite as light as yours). Your merino, however, somehow, does holds up well. Amazing.
Primarily Fabric-Conscious
18
That it’s as local from farm to closet as I can find. I love feeling I’m wearing a little bit of my mother country land and people. I feel connected to something good and life-enhancing while wearing your clothing. But, if the clothes were not also top quality, comfortable and beautiful I would not buy them.
Primarily Supply-Chain-Conscious
19
The temperature versatility, non-itchiness, non-smelliness of the light-weight wool. Ideally I wear a "next-to-skin" wool layer (top) all the time, any weather.
Vocally Price-Sensitive
20
I love the fit, color & comfort of the lightweight wool tee. It's very easy to handwash & lay out to dry.
Primarily Comfort-Conscious
21
The quality of the wool fabric. LOVE the boxers.
Primarily Fabric-Conscious
22
My Bella blouse is definitely different than the wool stuff available from other companies. I like that it’s a small, responsible company. And washable is a requirement for me, as a busy mom of six kids, I don’t do dry clean.
Primarily Fabric-Conscious
23
I feel cozy warm, I love the feel of substantial wool cloth on my skin, and get complements on the green color by everyone
Primarily Comfort-Conscious
24
they way it feels and the way it performs.
Primarily Comfort-Conscious
25
The softness, the style (so much cuter than the basic leggings and crew necks that other places offer)
Primarily Aesthetics/Style-Conscious
26
The trends and the fit.
Primarily Aesthetics/Style-Conscious
27
Comfortable
Primarily Comfort-Conscious
28
The wool quality
Primarily Fabric-Conscious
29
Wool done in a stylish but functional way.
Primarily Fabric-Conscious
30
knowing it is made locally from sustainably (sp.?) sourced materials
Primarily Supply-Chain-Conscious
31
very high quality
Primarily Aesthetics/Style-Conscious
32
the fact that it is made of merino wool
Primarily Fabric-Conscious
33
I have a wool jersey in brown. I had been looking unsuccessfully for that color for some time. I also have the hood-scarf which I wore all winter.
Primarily Aesthetics/Style-Conscious
34
I don’t own any, styles are not attractive and very pricey
Vocally Price-Sensitive
35
Soft, breathable fabrics
Primarily Fabric-Conscious
36
the wool aspect because it's sustainable from a manufacturing perspective (and you have great practices) and because it's sustainable from a consumer perspective (I can wear a lot without washing, it lasts a long time, it's versatile)
Primarily Eco-Conscious
37
Well-made. Quality materials. Long lasting. Responsibly sourced. Better for environment. Not fast fashion.
Primarily Supply-Chain-Conscious
38
Take the gaberdine western shirt, it drapes beautifully ,it resisist wrinkles, it is warm but not bulky, great care has been taken to crate a collar that falls attractively. I feel that I am well dressed when I have it on, further, I consider it my high quality, dependable gear. Gear that was once common,but lost to the trend of instant land fill fast fashion.
Primarily Aesthetics/Style-Conscious
39
Fabric quality and manufacture origin
Primarily Supply-Chain-Conscious
40
Looks good, made in USA
Primarily Supply-Chain-Conscious
41
Unique
Vocally Price-Sensitive
42
Made in US; like Pima cotton and merino wool.
Primarily Supply-Chain-Conscious
43
I love wool. Sustainable, humane wool clothing is wonderful.
Primarily Fabric-Conscious
44
Quality, durability
Primarily Eco-Conscious
45
Not happy with the fit.
Vocally Price-Sensitive
46
Fine quality wool
Primarily Fabric-Conscious
47
Local sources and manufacturing
Vocally Price-Sensitive
48
I love wool clothing. I love even more that it's made here in the US.
Primarily Supply-Chain-Conscious
49
Made in America of American wool— that is more important than the organic designation, to me. The farmers to the company
Primarily Supply-Chain-Conscious
50
Natural fibers, affordable, durable, made in U.S.
Vocally Price-Sensitive
51
The temperature regulating abilities, as well as the durability (I am still wearing my joggers from several years back).
Primarily Supply-Chain-Conscious
52
Made in USA with American materials
Primarily Supply-Chain-Conscious
53
Wool content, other natural fibers, made in usa
Primarily Fabric-Conscious
54
The ethically sourced materials, made in USA, and and well made clothing. Also, yes, a company that is small and independent (I think).
Primarily Supply-Chain-Conscious
55
It’s warmth and thin fiber 😊
Vocally Price-Sensitive
56
N/A
Vocally Price-Sensitive
57
I like that it’s local and good quality
Primarily Aesthetics/Style-Conscious
58
The comfort of the next to skin line.
Primarily Comfort-Conscious
59
American made (and usually grown) wool
Primarily Supply-Chain-Conscious
60
That is is made from 100percent wool or cotton
Primarily Fabric-Conscious
61
It’s made in the USA of wool.
Vocally Price-Sensitive
62
Good and beautiful material like wool, cotton and silk.
Primarily Fabric-Conscious
63
I like its feel, I like its composition/content and its value - it wears like iron, but feels like the soft wool from the sheep that provides it.
Primarily Fabric-Conscious
64
The fact that they are made in the USA.
Primarily Supply-Chain-Conscious
There are no rows in this table

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