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Hannah Campbell
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Hannah Campbell

YNAB cover letter

Introduce self
Why I’m interested
Why I would be a great fit
Platforms I’ve designed for
Explain move from marketing/communications to product design
Perspective – how design should be done, what it’s used for, why it’s important
Experience designing great interfaces and experiences for most of the platforms listed above.
A designer who views your job as that of a problem solver.
A knack for interaction design and love logical UI patterns, but you also foster a deep empathy for people.
Enjoy digging through (and conducting!) research that leads the way in the design process. You’ve been around the block a few times and know what it means to design a mature, evolving product.

Success of a designer at YNAB hinges upon the ability to approach design as holistic problem solving for both customer and business goals. We work collaboratively here and you’ll listen to ideas, questions, and critiques from teammates with grace and patience. That said, you know your stuff and can eloquently and logically explain design decisions. You see this type of exchange as critical to the success of yourself and our product: it is through sharing ideas and being open to the brilliance of others that we arrive at the best solutions.

I love to create. It started when I was a kid – building LEGO constructions, stitching cross-stitch patterns, and writing stories about my hamster. That desire transformed into a career focused on solving human and business problems through creative, compelling, and inspired design.

Design sprints

Interactive case study
it’s impact on how I view design – how, what it’s for, why it’s important
problem: the best way to learn to be a nurse is by being a nurse; but one must be licensed to do so; also, with experience being the main learning, how can we give nursing students or young nurses a situation where they can learn in a safe space?
how: it took a diverse team to dig into the problem, ask questions of our internal experts, and create a solution that could be tested
Design doesn’t have to be “perfect” in our (the creator’s eyes) for it to solve a problem for the user. Doesn’t mean it shouldn’t be iterated and polished but in order to ask the next question, we much first get it in the hands of our users and learn from their experience and opinions

Auto mechanic – ASE certifications
solve problem for the technician who has to take time off to renew their certification; provide a way for the tech to continue their learning throughout the year, stay up to date and verify that knowledge

Lactation consultant – reference guide
Up-to-date drug reference so they can quickly and confidently give guidance to mothers
Lessons in getting user feedback, releasing too late, working with a partner

Customer discovery blitz
Used that as a lesson and have since found ways to talk with customers or potential customers to understand their experience, empathize and really understand their problem
Why hire?
Approach problems holistically – solving for user and business but also for the team
Empathy for the user but also the team – finding ways to connect to the user, be empathic, and help teammates connect to the user, too
(Use the app game)

Success of a designer at YNAB hinges upon the ability to approach design as holistic problem solving for both customer and business goals. We work collaboratively here and you’ll listen to ideas, questions, and critiques from teammates with grace and patience. That said, you know your stuff and can eloquently and logically explain design decisions. You see this type of exchange as critical to the success of yourself and our product: it is through sharing ideas and being open to the brilliance of others that we arrive at the best solutions.

We think it’s important to be helpful and teach one another. You know, lend a helping hand, and look to ease a friend’s burden. When you’re friendly, I guess it means that you take an interest in others, and tend to listen more than you talk. If you (gasp!) change your mind, we think that’s cool, because…well, there’s nothing wrong with changing your mind. When speaking of others be kind. Is what you’re about to say true, kind, and necessary? We love humbly confident people who are proud of their craft, and stay humble so they don’t stop learning. You know what makes life great? You assume good intentions, and give others the benefit of the doubt. Even then, you may still disagree—a healthy problem to have between two people that listen, and then listen more. With all of that said, the disciplined and relentless pursuit of important (sometimes scary) things is awesome. And my heavens, if you have a sense of humo(u)r, we want you around (because you’re hilarious).

My focus on design has me most curious to solve problems in education, communication, and marketing. I'm also interested in user experience, instructional design, design thinking, and photography.
Outside of work, you would be right to expect that I have several personal works in progress — knit and crochet projects, a quilt made from my Grandma’s vintage fabrics, and most likely a couple rolls of film waiting to be developed.


What I’m looking for:
⭐ Creating beautiful, inspired work that makes an impact on the consumer and company
⭐ A collaborative team dedicated to doing their best work
⭐ A culture of continuous learning and deep thinking
⭐ A “No Assholes” policy
Not interested in:
👎 A culture of “low effort” and copy/paste
👎 Values posted on the wall but not visible in actions
👎 Buzzwords, clichés, and acronyms (see: The Office, season 3 episode 21)
👎 Free drinks and snacks, company awards (Ok, free food and drink are great but I'm motivated by the opportunity to do great work)

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